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Terra Drone in Terra Incognita

In an interesting move, the Japanese drone surveying company Terra Drone has opened an office in Fortitude Valley in Queensland. Fortitude Valley is a suburb of Brisbane most famous for shopping and nightlife. Terra Drone specialised in LiDAR surveying of construction, mining sites and forestry and land surveys. It also has a small unmanned crop spraying helicopter ideally suited for market gardens and small holdings typical of Japanese farming.

While Queensland has a reasonably progressive attitude to the use of drones, there has to be some worry associated with this diversification. The mining industry in Australia has been severely depleted during this current economic down-turn and as China has decreased its mineral requirements considerably.

Farming in Queensland tends to be on a larger scale. Australia, in general, and Queensland, in particular, has not been blessed with deep and fertile soils so fields must be larger to obtain the same yield. Precision farming is still at the early stages of implementation although there has been a $2.5 million project funded by Queensland’s Agriculture Department and the Federal Government. There are already several companies promoting Precision Agriculture throughout Australia so the market is not without competition.

The construction industry is also largely flat for the nation as a whole with growth forecast at a miserly 0.1%. South Australia and Western Australia have the most promising outlook while Queensland construction is expected to contract by around 7%.

The markets that Terra Drone normally address have a fairly poor outlook and they have sited their office in an area not normally associated with commercial activities that might need a drone. They have set themselves a unique challenge and we wish them luck.

For more information about the commercial UAV market, please click here.

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[fusion_builder_container hundred_percent="no" equal_height_columns="no" menu_anchor="" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" class="" id="" background_color="" background_image="" background_position="center center" background_repeat="no-repeat" fade="no" background_parallax="none" parallax_speed="0.3" video_mp4="" video_webm="" video_ogv="" video_url="" video_aspect_ratio="16:9" video_loop="yes" video_mute="yes" overlay_color="" video_preview_image="" border_size="" border_color="" border_style="solid" padding_top="" padding_bottom="" padding_left="" padding_right=""][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type="1_1" layout="1_1" background_position="left top" background_color="" border_size="" border_color="" border_style="solid" border_position="all" spacing="yes" background_image="" background_repeat="no-repeat" padding_top="" padding_right="" padding_bottom="" padding_left="" margin_top="0px" margin_bottom="0px" class="" id="" animation_type="" animation_speed="0.3" animation_direction="left" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" center_content="no" last="no" min_height="" hover_type="none" link=""][fusion_imageframe image_id="5022|full" max_width="" style_type="" blur="" stylecolor="" hover_type="none" bordersize="" bordercolor="" borderradius="" align="center" lightbox="no" gallery_id="" lightbox_image="" lightbox_image_id="" alt="" link="" linktarget="_self" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" class="" id="" animation_type="" animation_direction="left" animation_speed="0.3" animation_offset=""]http://217.199.187.200/valourconsultancy.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/Terra-Drone-1-1-1024x619-1.png[/fusion_imageframe][fusion_separator style_type="default" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" class="" id="" sep_color="#ffffff" top_margin="20" bottom_margin="20" border_size="" icon="" icon_circle="" icon_circle_color="" width="" alignment="center" /][fusion_text] In an interesting move, the Japanese drone surveying company Terra Drone has opened an office in Fortitude Valley in Queensland. Fortitude Valley is a suburb of Brisbane most famous for shopping and nightlife. Terra Drone specialised in LiDAR surveying of construction, mining sites and forestry and land surveys. It also has a small unmanned crop spraying helicopter ideally suited for market gardens and small holdings typical of Japanese farming. While Queensland has a reasonably progressive attitude to the use of drones, there has to be some worry associated with this diversification. The mining industry in Australia has been severely depleted during this current economic down-turn and as China has decreased its mineral requirements considerably. Farming in Queensland tends to be on a larger scale. Australia, in general, and Queensland, in particular, has not been blessed with deep and fertile soils so fields must be larger to obtain the same yield. Precision farming is still at the early stages of implementation although there has been a $2.5 million project funded by Queensland's Agriculture Department and the Federal Government. There are already several companies promoting Precision Agriculture throughout Australia so the market is not without competition. The construction industry is also largely flat for the nation as a whole with growth forecast at a miserly 0.1%. South Australia and Western Australia have the most promising outlook while Queensland construction is expected to contract by around 7%. The markets that Terra Drone normally address have a fairly poor outlook and they have sited their office in an area not normally associated with commercial activities that might need a drone. They have set themselves a unique challenge and we wish them luck. For more information about the commercial UAV market, please click here. [/fusion_text][/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]

UAVs are a Key Enabler in Construction

Many people believe UAVs will become a big deal in the commercial construction space.

Companies like 3DR, Parrot, DJI and many others have bet big on this assumption.

We believe more than a 150,000 UAVs will be in active use in the asset, building (construction), land and mining inspection/surveying globally in 2017.

A prime example of drones being used in this area is Carillion, a UK-based facilities management and construction company.

The company’s Head of Building Surveying Services, Phil Neenan, highlighted how the company is deploying drones to gain better access to buildings and hard to reach areas.

This can vary from sloping rooftops to soft ground that will be damaged by the use of heavy vehicles/equipment.

Phil stated, “Using drones allows us to access sites without causing any disruption, and it’s much cheaper and faster to hire a drone than to raise scaffolding.

“Most importantly, by removing the need to work at height, they make our job safer.” For more information on this article, click here.

Furthermore, the capabilities of how UAVs examine different structures with high definition images, advanced thermographic and ultrasonic sensors makes a big difference to the level of details that can be retrieved.

Carillion use an external supplier called Team UAV,  but they have also used other drone operators such as the Drone Company, and Iron Bird.

The Drone Company, based in Kent, consists of 5 operators and has over 1,000 hours of flight time. Iron Bird is based in Liverpool and the business predominantly focuses on the filmography and entertainment sector.

Other notable projects that Carillion have used UAVs are the Royal Liverpool Hospital, and Birmingham Library.

For more information about the commercial UAV market, please click here.

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[fusion_builder_container hundred_percent="no" equal_height_columns="no" menu_anchor="" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" class="" id="" background_color="" background_image="" background_position="center center" background_repeat="no-repeat" fade="no" background_parallax="none" parallax_speed="0.3" video_mp4="" video_webm="" video_ogv="" video_url="" video_aspect_ratio="16:9" video_loop="yes" video_mute="yes" overlay_color="" video_preview_image="" border_size="" border_color="" border_style="solid" padding_top="" padding_bottom="" padding_left="" padding_right=""][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type="1_1" layout="1_1" background_position="left top" background_color="" border_size="" border_color="" border_style="solid" border_position="all" spacing="yes" background_image="" background_repeat="no-repeat" padding_top="" padding_right="" padding_bottom="" padding_left="" margin_top="0px" margin_bottom="0px" class="" id="" animation_type="" animation_speed="0.3" animation_direction="left" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" center_content="no" last="no" min_height="" hover_type="none" link=""][fusion_imageframe image_id="5026|full" max_width="" style_type="" blur="" stylecolor="" hover_type="none" bordersize="" bordercolor="" borderradius="" align="center" lightbox="no" gallery_id="" lightbox_image="" lightbox_image_id="" alt="" link="" linktarget="_self" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" class="" id="" animation_type="" animation_direction="left" animation_speed="0.3" animation_offset=""]http://217.199.187.200/valourconsultancy.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/Carillion-3-e1463533766985-1024x516-1.jpg[/fusion_imageframe][fusion_separator style_type="default" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" class="" id="" sep_color="#ffffff" top_margin="20" bottom_margin="20" border_size="" icon="" icon_circle="" icon_circle_color="" width="" alignment="center" /][fusion_text] Many people believe UAVs will become a big deal in the commercial construction space. Companies like 3DR, Parrot, DJI and many others have bet big on this assumption. We believe more than a 150,000 UAVs will be in active use in the asset, building (construction), land and mining inspection/surveying globally in 2017. A prime example of drones being used in this area is Carillion, a UK-based facilities management and construction company. The company’s Head of Building Surveying Services, Phil Neenan, highlighted how the company is deploying drones to gain better access to buildings and hard to reach areas. This can vary from sloping rooftops to soft ground that will be damaged by the use of heavy vehicles/equipment. Phil stated, “Using drones allows us to access sites without causing any disruption, and it’s much cheaper and faster to hire a drone than to raise scaffolding. “Most importantly, by removing the need to work at height, they make our job safer.” For more information on this article, click here. Furthermore, the capabilities of how UAVs examine different structures with high definition images, advanced thermographic and ultrasonic sensors makes a big difference to the level of details that can be retrieved. Carillion use an external supplier called Team UAV,  but they have also used other drone operators such as the Drone Company, and Iron Bird. The Drone Company, based in Kent, consists of 5 operators and has over 1,000 hours of flight time. Iron Bird is based in Liverpool and the business predominantly focuses on the filmography and entertainment sector. Other notable projects that Carillion have used UAVs are the Royal Liverpool Hospital, and Birmingham Library. For more information about the commercial UAV market, please click here. [/fusion_text][/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]

Interview with Zepcam’s CEO & Founder, Bart van der Aa

Tell us a little bit about Zepcam?

Zepcam is a Dutch technology company that specializes in body-worn camera and video technology.

Founded in 2008, its offers a complete end to end solution for bodycams and mobile CCTV: integration of field devices (bodycams, vehicle video), server technology and video management software.

Zepcam has been focusing especially on live streaming technology over wireless networks like 3G/4G/Wifi. The company offers their own web based client software and has integrations with 3rd party video management software like Milestone, Genetec and OnnSi / Seetec.

Bart, Zepcam’s CEO, believes that his company provides the best up to date technology for body-worn cameras and in-vehicle cameras, for both recording and live streaming.  Zepcam also offer back-end support and services with their partners. Zepcam has worked extensively with Motorola, Alcatel Lucent, and Cisco to name but a few of the well-known companies.

In addition to this, Zepcam has several R&D projects with these companies, and offer an API to allow the integration of its products and solutions for law enforcement control or command centers.

The Zepcam brand has become well recognized in the European and Asian body worn camera sphere, particularly for live streaming, the company’s key unique selling point. One of the crucial aspects of this has been making its live streaming technology convenient and reliable.

Each countries’ cellular networks are complex and dynamic and the company has learned many lessons over the last five years. Its Mobile Video Box solution is a product that is a direct evolution from these experiences. This is a solution for vehicle cams to stream over the Zepcam platform.

Zepcam sells into forty countries and is the market leader for body-worn cameras in the Netherlands, Germany and Switzerland.

What are the challenges in the body-worn camera and systems market?

The challenges faced by Zepcam are slightly different to the general market.

Overall, clients become more demanding and the body-worn camera market is becoming more competitive.

Zepcam is seeing new competitors entering the market, offering camera-only solutions and some radio manufacturers have added a camera to their equipment. So, more cameras on the person. On the other hand, clients demand integrated solutions for their cameras in the field. They demand well integrated solutions of bodycams, IT back end and video management software.

This is exactly where the Zepcam engineering team has been focusing on: one integrated solution for body worn and on-vehicle cams, back end solution and video management software.

For Zepcam live streaming video will always be a crucial part of its proposition. Zepcam excels in delivering superior and low-latency video streaming with its T1-live model. Zepcam also developed the mobile video box that allows 3G/4G live streaming of IP cameras. Besides video streaming, the mobile video box can record video streams, audio and GPS.

A Zepcam body-worn camera

Authorities in mainland Europe and some regions of Asia have expressed great interest in these live streaming cameras.

Market Drivers

In the UK and USA, body-worn cameras dedicated to data gathering and transparency are the principal drivers for purchasing the technology.

In Europe, any extra tool to aid real-time intelligence operations, such as live streaming, to combat terrorism is well worth the investment.

The need for a full end-to-end solution is increasing. A demand that Zepcam can fulfill thanks to its own cloud and video management software and the possibility to integrate with third party software, making it easier for their clients to start deploying the bodycams. Zepcam has worked with Motorola Systems, Cisco and Thales Group.

It is imperative that relationships are also built with local integrators for CCTV installations or other video management software companies.

In the Netherlands, Zepcam has strong relations with VCS Integrations, and this collaboration has allowed both companies to quickly deploy solutions in the field effective.

How will the market evolve in 2017?

Zepcam expects a greater competition from a hardware perspective, an increased demand for a complete solution and improved live streaming features. Also, they expect larger deployment volumes as police forces move from small pilot tests to mass roll outs.

Zepcam noticed that police forces want to move from live streaming in the vehicle to continuing that feed as the officers leave the car onto the streets and buildings. A demand that Zepcam can fulfill.

Bart also expects the private security market to increase rapidly. Private security firms, like G4S, have large numbers of people in the field. The reason for this increased demand is that these firms need to be more accountable and document the interactions of their operatives. In order to avoid complaints and potentially expensive litigation costs.

Private security guard wearing bodycam

Furthermore, as the number of private operations increase, these firms will look to cut costs by splitting operatives to work from groups or pairs to individuals operating on their own.

These will further necessitate the need for private security personnel to wear body-worn cameras.

How will Zepcam anticipate the changing market?

Zepcam is going to make it possible to redact videos in their web based video management system in the short term. Video redaction is becoming a “must have” feature in digital video evidence management systems. Especially in the US and British law enforcement markets.

A new cost effective record only body-worn camera will be released in Q2 of 2017. This product will be widely announced soon.

By continuing to work closely with system integrators Zepcam will ensure improvements of the integration of their live streaming body-worn cameras and in-vehicle solution.

What are Zepcam’s recent deployment?

Zepcam recently started deploying its mobile video box in vehicles in Dublin airport.

Airport security and the systems used in airports are becoming ever more sophisticated, and Zepcam believes its live streaming video solution will add an extra layer of security for travelers passing through the airport.

Additionally, the company is seeing bigger rollouts of body-worn cameras after successful trials with the German police.

Police forces in the State of Hessen, Germany, were one of the first forces to use Zepcam’s cameras, and the company is seeing a wider spread of adoption.

Expansion plans?

Zepcam is currently in a great position to continue pursuing business in Europe and the Middle East.

Asia is another promising market, particularly after the Hong Kong Police began using its live streaming cameras for special operations.

With the possibilities of remote engineering the maintenance workers and engineering may also prove to be a significant market in the future too.
For more information about the enterprise body-worn camera market and systems, please contact info@valourconsultancy.com

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Tell us a little bit about Zepcam?

Zepcam is a Dutch technology company that specializes in body-worn camera and video technology. Founded in 2008, its offers a complete end to end solution for bodycams and mobile CCTV: integration of field devices (bodycams, vehicle video), server technology and video management software. Zepcam has been focusing especially on live streaming technology over wireless networks like 3G/4G/Wifi. The company offers their own web based client software and has integrations with 3rd party video management software like Milestone, Genetec and OnnSi / Seetec. Bart, Zepcam’s CEO, believes that his company provides the best up to date technology for body-worn cameras and in-vehicle cameras, for both recording and live streaming.  Zepcam also offer back-end support and services with their partners. Zepcam has worked extensively with Motorola, Alcatel Lucent, and Cisco to name but a few of the well-known companies. In addition to this, Zepcam has several R&D projects with these companies, and offer an API to allow the integration of its products and solutions for law enforcement control or command centers. The Zepcam brand has become well recognized in the European and Asian body worn camera sphere, particularly for live streaming, the company’s key unique selling point. One of the crucial aspects of this has been making its live streaming technology convenient and reliable. Each countries’ cellular networks are complex and dynamic and the company has learned many lessons over the last five years. Its Mobile Video Box solution is a product that is a direct evolution from these experiences. This is a solution for vehicle cams to stream over the Zepcam platform. Zepcam sells into forty countries and is the market leader for body-worn cameras in the Netherlands, Germany and Switzerland.

What are the challenges in the body-worn camera and systems market?

The challenges faced by Zepcam are slightly different to the general market. Overall, clients become more demanding and the body-worn camera market is becoming more competitive. Zepcam is seeing new competitors entering the market, offering camera-only solutions and some radio manufacturers have added a camera to their equipment. So, more cameras on the person. On the other hand, clients demand integrated solutions for their cameras in the field. They demand well integrated solutions of bodycams, IT back end and video management software. This is exactly where the Zepcam engineering team has been focusing on: one integrated solution for body worn and on-vehicle cams, back end solution and video management software. For Zepcam live streaming video will always be a crucial part of its proposition. Zepcam excels in delivering superior and low-latency video streaming with its T1-live model. Zepcam also developed the mobile video box that allows 3G/4G live streaming of IP cameras. Besides video streaming, the mobile video box can record video streams, audio and GPS.

A Zepcam body-worn camera

Authorities in mainland Europe and some regions of Asia have expressed great interest in these live streaming cameras. Market Drivers In the UK and USA, body-worn cameras dedicated to data gathering and transparency are the principal drivers for purchasing the technology. In Europe, any extra tool to aid real-time intelligence operations, such as live streaming, to combat terrorism is well worth the investment. The need for a full end-to-end solution is increasing. A demand that Zepcam can fulfill thanks to its own cloud and video management software and the possibility to integrate with third party software, making it easier for their clients to start deploying the bodycams. Zepcam has worked with Motorola Systems, Cisco and Thales Group. It is imperative that relationships are also built with local integrators for CCTV installations or other video management software companies. In the Netherlands, Zepcam has strong relations with VCS Integrations, and this collaboration has allowed both companies to quickly deploy solutions in the field effective.

How will the market evolve in 2017?

Zepcam expects a greater competition from a hardware perspective, an increased demand for a complete solution and improved live streaming features. Also, they expect larger deployment volumes as police forces move from small pilot tests to mass roll outs. Zepcam noticed that police forces want to move from live streaming in the vehicle to continuing that feed as the officers leave the car onto the streets and buildings. A demand that Zepcam can fulfill. Bart also expects the private security market to increase rapidly. Private security firms, like G4S, have large numbers of people in the field. The reason for this increased demand is that these firms need to be more accountable and document the interactions of their operatives. In order to avoid complaints and potentially expensive litigation costs.

Private security guard wearing bodycam

Furthermore, as the number of private operations increase, these firms will look to cut costs by splitting operatives to work from groups or pairs to individuals operating on their own. These will further necessitate the need for private security personnel to wear body-worn cameras.

How will Zepcam anticipate the changing market?

Zepcam is going to make it possible to redact videos in their web based video management system in the short term. Video redaction is becoming a “must have” feature in digital video evidence management systems. Especially in the US and British law enforcement markets. A new cost effective record only body-worn camera will be released in Q2 of 2017. This product will be widely announced soon. By continuing to work closely with system integrators Zepcam will ensure improvements of the integration of their live streaming body-worn cameras and in-vehicle solution.

What are Zepcam’s recent deployment?

Zepcam recently started deploying its mobile video box in vehicles in Dublin airport. Airport security and the systems used in airports are becoming ever more sophisticated, and Zepcam believes its live streaming video solution will add an extra layer of security for travelers passing through the airport. Additionally, the company is seeing bigger rollouts of body-worn cameras after successful trials with the German police. Police forces in the State of Hessen, Germany, were one of the first forces to use Zepcam’s cameras, and the company is seeing a wider spread of adoption.

Expansion plans?

Zepcam is currently in a great position to continue pursuing business in Europe and the Middle East. Asia is another promising market, particularly after the Hong Kong Police began using its live streaming cameras for special operations. With the possibilities of remote engineering the maintenance workers and engineering may also prove to be a significant market in the future too. For more information about the enterprise body-worn camera market and systems, please contact info@valourconsultancy.com [/fusion_text][/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]

How will Wearable Body-Worn Cameras Perform in 2017?

The rapid growth of the wearable camera market has surprised few over the last five years. Consumer wearable camera companies, such as GroPro, have made vast fortunes and become iconic brands for those with outdoorsy, adventurous lifestyles.

The enterprise market for body-worn cameras (BWC) has recorded a similar uptake in demand, primarily driven by trial deployments in law enforcement and soon we will see the market skyrocket as many of the pilot testing schemes turn to full-scale deployments. The fascinating contrast between consumer and enterprise wearable cameras is where the real commercial value lies; for the enterprise market, it’s in the storage of video footage and the digital video management system. On the consumer side, the value lies in the hardware itself. Valour Consultancy projects the global digital video management system market will be worth $1.8 billion by 2020, compared to body-worn camera hardware sales of slightly less than $400 million.

Although the BWC and systems market is becoming financially lucrative, the large number of players in the market is beginning to diminish. Clear strengths and weakness about each vendor are well-known to industry observers, and certain vendors dominate various markets due to their offerings. In the United States and Europe, Taser International is one of the market leaders, last year winning the biggest deployment of BWCs for the London Metropolitan Police. The company has been resourceful to subsidise its devices used for trial uses, and offers a practical end-to-end solution for BWCs and data storage. Nevertheless, this does not mean the company will storm away from the others, as VIEVU recently proved, winning a contract with the NYPD to supply BWCs. The law enforcement market is fragmented and extremely autonomous. Some police departments have been subscribing to camera and video solutions for other applications, like in-vehicle patrol cars. As such, the companies already providing video management solutions for these applications clearly have a “foot in the door”.

With such heavy competition in the market, prices are expected to continue falling and companies will need new differentiators such as live streaming, facial recognition software, or other elements of evidence video management.

There are a host of reasons for the use and incorporation of BWCs in law enforcement. Yet one of the major drivers for police officers using BWCs are accountability and transparency for their actions.

Listed below are some of the key drivers for body-worn cameras and video:

  • Today’s frenzied media and an increasingly perceptive public are quick to criticise and lament the discrimination and perceived wrongs of law enforcement around the world. This could be from treating certain segments of a country’s population unfairly, or advantageously. BWCs can provide a credible unbiased perspective for both law enforcement officers and the public, where recorded interactions can be viewed by a third-party. This should result in a greater level of transparency.
  • The technology can act as a deterrent just as other forms of video surveillance like CCTV does in reducing criminal offences and thus increasing confidence in the local community. Law enforcement officers may also feel more confident as subjects are less likely to be offensive or aggressive whilst being recorded.
  • Body-worn video (BWV) can speed up the justice process. After viewing footage of incidents, defendants are much more likely to change a previous “not guilty” plea, to “guilty” if video evidence is damning.
  • Addressing public complaints against the police, from 2011 to 2016, Indianapolis, Austin, San Jose, and San Francisco, paid a total of $16.6 million in taxpayers’ funds to settle 122 police-misconduct lawsuits. That equates to $136,066 per case. Over a slightly longer time period, the city of Philadelphia has paid $40 million to settle 584 of the 1,223 police-misconduct lawsuits lodged since January 2009. If BWCs and video can reduce the number of false police-misconduct cases, even if it is only a small margin of the total, purchasing such technology is worthwhile.
  • Along with digitalisation of police tools, the methods used to record crimes are becoming a prominent matter. BWV will be a tool used to ensure the accuracy and credibility of such crime recordings.
  • The wide proliferation of smartphones has impacted the world in a number of positive ways. Cameras incorporated in every smartphone sold today have enabled users to take pictures at a moment’s notice. This also entails a number videos of potential police mistreatments of the public, some of which are, at the very least, embarrassing for the law enforcement officers involved. BWV enables police officers to provide a third-party independent unbiased account of their actions to counterbalance these difficult situations.

Key Takeaways

  • More than 3.3 million BWCs will be deployed by 2017, and annual shipments will exceed 1.2 million units.
  • The European market will become the biggest market in revenues terms this year, overtaking North America.
  • The demand for high-end recording BWCs and devices with connectivity capabilities will also increase substantially. As in IoT industry, users will want live or near real-time access to video footage for analysis.

For more information about Valour Consultancy’s report on the enterprise BWC market, please click here.

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[fusion_builder_container hundred_percent="no" equal_height_columns="no" menu_anchor="" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" class="" id="" background_color="" background_image="" background_position="center center" background_repeat="no-repeat" fade="no" background_parallax="none" parallax_speed="0.3" video_mp4="" video_webm="" video_ogv="" video_url="" video_aspect_ratio="16:9" video_loop="yes" video_mute="yes" overlay_color="" video_preview_image="" border_size="" border_color="" border_style="solid" padding_top="" padding_bottom="" padding_left="" padding_right=""][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type="1_1" layout="1_1" background_position="left top" background_color="" border_size="" border_color="" border_style="solid" border_position="all" spacing="yes" background_image="" background_repeat="no-repeat" padding_top="" padding_right="" padding_bottom="" padding_left="" margin_top="0px" margin_bottom="0px" class="" id="" animation_type="" animation_speed="0.3" animation_direction="left" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" center_content="no" last="no" min_height="" hover_type="none" link=""][fusion_imageframe image_id="5032|full" max_width="" style_type="" blur="" stylecolor="" hover_type="none" bordersize="" bordercolor="" borderradius="" align="center" lightbox="no" gallery_id="" lightbox_image="" lightbox_image_id="" alt="" link="" linktarget="_self" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" class="" id="" animation_type="" animation_direction="left" animation_speed="0.3" animation_offset=""]http://217.199.187.200/valourconsultancy.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/Blog-1-2017-1.jpg[/fusion_imageframe][fusion_separator style_type="default" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" class="" id="" sep_color="#ffffff" top_margin="20" bottom_margin="20" border_size="" icon="" icon_circle="" icon_circle_color="" width="" alignment="center" /][fusion_text] The rapid growth of the wearable camera market has surprised few over the last five years. Consumer wearable camera companies, such as GroPro, have made vast fortunes and become iconic brands for those with outdoorsy, adventurous lifestyles. The enterprise market for body-worn cameras (BWC) has recorded a similar uptake in demand, primarily driven by trial deployments in law enforcement and soon we will see the market skyrocket as many of the pilot testing schemes turn to full-scale deployments. The fascinating contrast between consumer and enterprise wearable cameras is where the real commercial value lies; for the enterprise market, it’s in the storage of video footage and the digital video management system. On the consumer side, the value lies in the hardware itself. Valour Consultancy projects the global digital video management system market will be worth $1.8 billion by 2020, compared to body-worn camera hardware sales of slightly less than $400 million. Although the BWC and systems market is becoming financially lucrative, the large number of players in the market is beginning to diminish. Clear strengths and weakness about each vendor are well-known to industry observers, and certain vendors dominate various markets due to their offerings. In the United States and Europe, Taser International is one of the market leaders, last year winning the biggest deployment of BWCs for the London Metropolitan Police. The company has been resourceful to subsidise its devices used for trial uses, and offers a practical end-to-end solution for BWCs and data storage. Nevertheless, this does not mean the company will storm away from the others, as VIEVU recently proved, winning a contract with the NYPD to supply BWCs. The law enforcement market is fragmented and extremely autonomous. Some police departments have been subscribing to camera and video solutions for other applications, like in-vehicle patrol cars. As such, the companies already providing video management solutions for these applications clearly have a “foot in the door”. With such heavy competition in the market, prices are expected to continue falling and companies will need new differentiators such as live streaming, facial recognition software, or other elements of evidence video management. There are a host of reasons for the use and incorporation of BWCs in law enforcement. Yet one of the major drivers for police officers using BWCs are accountability and transparency for their actions. Listed below are some of the key drivers for body-worn cameras and video:
  • Today’s frenzied media and an increasingly perceptive public are quick to criticise and lament the discrimination and perceived wrongs of law enforcement around the world. This could be from treating certain segments of a country’s population unfairly, or advantageously. BWCs can provide a credible unbiased perspective for both law enforcement officers and the public, where recorded interactions can be viewed by a third-party. This should result in a greater level of transparency.
  • The technology can act as a deterrent just as other forms of video surveillance like CCTV does in reducing criminal offences and thus increasing confidence in the local community. Law enforcement officers may also feel more confident as subjects are less likely to be offensive or aggressive whilst being recorded.
  • Body-worn video (BWV) can speed up the justice process. After viewing footage of incidents, defendants are much more likely to change a previous “not guilty” plea, to “guilty” if video evidence is damning.
  • Addressing public complaints against the police, from 2011 to 2016, Indianapolis, Austin, San Jose, and San Francisco, paid a total of $16.6 million in taxpayers’ funds to settle 122 police-misconduct lawsuits. That equates to $136,066 per case. Over a slightly longer time period, the city of Philadelphia has paid $40 million to settle 584 of the 1,223 police-misconduct lawsuits lodged since January 2009. If BWCs and video can reduce the number of false police-misconduct cases, even if it is only a small margin of the total, purchasing such technology is worthwhile.
  • Along with digitalisation of police tools, the methods used to record crimes are becoming a prominent matter. BWV will be a tool used to ensure the accuracy and credibility of such crime recordings.
  • The wide proliferation of smartphones has impacted the world in a number of positive ways. Cameras incorporated in every smartphone sold today have enabled users to take pictures at a moment’s notice. This also entails a number videos of potential police mistreatments of the public, some of which are, at the very least, embarrassing for the law enforcement officers involved. BWV enables police officers to provide a third-party independent unbiased account of their actions to counterbalance these difficult situations.
Key Takeaways
  • More than 3.3 million BWCs will be deployed by 2017, and annual shipments will exceed 1.2 million units.
  • The European market will become the biggest market in revenues terms this year, overtaking North America.
  • The demand for high-end recording BWCs and devices with connectivity capabilities will also increase substantially. As in IoT industry, users will want live or near real-time access to video footage for analysis.
For more information about Valour Consultancy's report on the enterprise BWC market, please click here. [/fusion_text][/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]

Connected Aircraft in the Internet of Things

The advent of broadband connectivity, in the air and on the ground, has meant that the Internet of Things (IoT) revolution is now reaching the aircraft. The e-Aircraft represents a paradigm shift for airlines and many are now in the early stages of deploying various connected aircraft applications. Several have begun to embrace staged increases in electronic flight bag (EFB) capabilities often starting with one or two apps that they can later build upon. The benefits of eTechlog, eCabin Logbook and enhanced flight operational quality assurance (FOQA) programs using quick access recorder (QAR) data are becoming better understood, while aircraft health monitoring solutions are being enriched by the infusion of increased data flows from previously disparate sub-systems and other information sources on and off the aircraft. Overall, it is possible for substantial cost savings, in addition to greater ancillary revenues, to be realised from robust implementation of connected aircraft applications.

All of this has been made possible by what can be described as a perfect storm of conditions. Today, almost a third of the world’s total commercial active fleet has in-flight connectivity (IFC) and new, high capacity solutions promise to push further the boundaries of what the connected aircraft can achieve. Service providers are seeking to eliminate choke points and make the very best of available bandwidth by using the latest and greatest equipment such as highly efficient modems, intelligent wireless access points (WAPs) and more powerful server units. There is also huge interest in better performing flat panel antennas that promise to minimise fuel burn caused by drag. Additionally, next-generation aircraft like the 787 and A350 are flying data centres in all but name, generating huge amounts of data every flight by virtue of their very design. At the same time, commercial off the shelf (COTS) technology is rapidly evolving and airport surface data communications continue to improve.

Consequently, a whole host of new services are springing up with software providers and application developers creating innovative solutions around many different parts of the connected aircraft to help optimise airline processes. In many ways, the current situation is somewhat reminiscent of the iPhone’s debut in 2007. Back then, few could have foreseen the birth of an app ecosystem that would allow consumers to pay for their groceries, call a cab and track it until its arrival, or even use their phone to turn on and off their lights from anywhere in the world. Indeed, the App Store wasn’t even launched until more than a year after the first iPhone. Undoubtedly, new applications will be dreamt up that make even seasoned industry veterans stand up and say “I wish I’d thought of that!”. Stakeholders therefore need to be agile and both ready and able to support analysis of trends they cannot yet envisage in order to quickly react to new service opportunities as they present themselves.

There are several challenges still to overcome before the industry can reap the rewards of the connected aircraft. First, airlines are undoubtedly confused about connectivity. Suppliers have invested considerable amounts in developing differentiated offerings and this lack of standards has resulted in deep concern about investing in the wrong technology. Second, there exists little in the way of tangible metrics that show how quickly a return on investment (ROI) may be achieved from connected aircraft applications. Third, there is a perception that the act of harnessing vast amounts of data results in magical value with some having overstated the reality of what is possible. Myths around cybersecurity and real-time connectivity also persist. Worries that aircraft can be hacked into and remotely flown off course are probably unfounded (but by no means trivial), while there should be a recognition that offloading data from aircraft in real-time may only be necessary if you can also act on that data in real-time. Fourth, airline departments are notorious for being siloed in their thinking and this can make entire operations much less efficient.

If an airline is trying to build the business case for the connected aircraft based on a single application, it will struggle. At the same time, there also needs to be a realisation that this is not an all or nothing decision. Applications can be phased in over time just as long as there is a comprehensive plan in place to do so. Clearly, there is no one-size-fits-all approach to the connected aircraft but most operators are looking for relatively simple first steps that are not too heavy on the implementation side. EFB lends itself well to fairly easy exploitation of “low-hanging fruit” with live weather being perhaps the simplest application to get started with. The elimination of “sneaker net” and paper-based approaches will also be on top of the to-do list for a number of carriers.

Most airlines have separated engineering from IT and so forth but they are going to have to find a way to blend them back together if they are to make a success of the connected aircraft. Building internal consensus should be a primary goal for carriers and strong consideration must be given to the creation of a central leadership function that sits atop organisational siloes to ensure projects are not slowed by different levels of influence and bureaucracy. This may reduce interdepartmental friction that exists because of markedly different goals and cost centres. Further, successful operators will need to acquire skills that can leverage big data. Good data scientists, in particular, do not just address business problems, they pick the right problems that, when solved, have the most value to an organisation.

External collaboration, too, will be critical to success in the connected aircraft market. Airlines, though sometimes somewhat isolationist by nature for competitive reasons, will naturally come together first via alliances and also, at key industry conferences to share best practices and lessons learned. To be seen as trusted partners to engage with, suppliers will also need to collaborate as the current lack of interoperability will surely not be tolerated indefinitely. A clear role exists for connectivity service providers and other entities not only to help airlines manage legacy systems and integration issues, but to foster the development of open architecture and industry standards that will expand choice and drive this sector forwards. The issue of cybersecurity will absolutely need to be addressed from multiple standpoints with those outside of the industry certain to be involved – especially as the adoption of COTS technology has opened up the world of aviation to a myriad of other systems.

Signs are that connectivity service providers, many of which have backed into the connected aircraft arena by happenstance, are making the right moves in this regard. Gogo, for example, has partnered with Ultramain Systems, PACE and The Weather Company, Global Eagle Entertainment (GEE) has acquired masFlight and navAero, Panasonic Avionics Corporation is working closely with Teledyne Controls and ViaSat recently purchased Arconics. The likes of Rockwell Collins and SITAONAIR, meanwhile, are cognisant of the need to make an array of connected aircraft applications work – no matter the provider – and are thus positioning themselves as one-stop shops able to handle integration and act as single entities capable of managing an airline’s data needs.

Interestingly, the passenger is the entry criteria for many airlines and most have either deployed, or announced plans to deploy IFC by now. Many are mid-way through implementation and just figuring out how the existence of this new capability will impact on different job roles. A better picture of how connected aircraft applications can result in efficiency gains will not become clear until deployment of connectivity is complete, or near-complete. This is one of the reasons the likes of Delta Air Lines, Southwest Airlines and Emirates are perhaps considered to be more so at the bleeding edge than others. Nevertheless, every airline will have a connected aircraft strategy in future. The question is whether it will be due to foresight and careful consideration of the challenges that currently exist or as a recovery measure by those that did not start their planning early enough.

Valour Consultancy’s latest report “How the Connected Aircraft fits into the Internet of Things” provides an up-to-date “helicopter” view of the technical opportunities, the challenges that currently act as a barrier to further adoption of connected aircraft applications and what needs to be done to help airlines and others take advantage of a revolution that is set to re-shape airline businesses and reinvent the passenger experience. It builds upon the company’s highly-acclaimed research into the passenger in-flight connectivity and in-flight entertainment markets. For an information brochure containing a full table of contents, click the above link.

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[fusion_builder_container hundred_percent="no" equal_height_columns="no" menu_anchor="" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" class="" id="" background_color="" background_image="" background_position="center center" background_repeat="no-repeat" fade="no" background_parallax="none" parallax_speed="0.3" video_mp4="" video_webm="" video_ogv="" video_url="" video_aspect_ratio="16:9" video_loop="yes" video_mute="yes" overlay_color="" video_preview_image="" border_size="" border_color="" border_style="solid" padding_top="" padding_bottom="" padding_left="" padding_right=""][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type="1_1" layout="1_1" background_position="left top" background_color="" border_size="" border_color="" border_style="solid" border_position="all" spacing="yes" background_image="" background_repeat="no-repeat" padding_top="" padding_right="" padding_bottom="" padding_left="" margin_top="0px" margin_bottom="0px" class="" id="" animation_type="" animation_speed="0.3" animation_direction="left" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" center_content="no" last="no" min_height="" hover_type="none" link=""][fusion_imageframe image_id="5035|full" max_width="" style_type="" blur="" stylecolor="" hover_type="none" bordersize="" bordercolor="" borderradius="" align="center" lightbox="no" gallery_id="" lightbox_image="" lightbox_image_id="" alt="" link="" linktarget="_self" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" class="" id="" animation_type="" animation_direction="left" animation_speed="0.3" animation_offset=""]http://217.199.187.200/valourconsultancy.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/network-782707_1280-min-1024x666-1.png[/fusion_imageframe][fusion_separator style_type="default" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" class="" id="" sep_color="#ffffff" top_margin="20" bottom_margin="20" border_size="" icon="" icon_circle="" icon_circle_color="" width="" alignment="center" /][fusion_text] The advent of broadband connectivity, in the air and on the ground, has meant that the Internet of Things (IoT) revolution is now reaching the aircraft. The e-Aircraft represents a paradigm shift for airlines and many are now in the early stages of deploying various connected aircraft applications. Several have begun to embrace staged increases in electronic flight bag (EFB) capabilities often starting with one or two apps that they can later build upon. The benefits of eTechlog, eCabin Logbook and enhanced flight operational quality assurance (FOQA) programs using quick access recorder (QAR) data are becoming better understood, while aircraft health monitoring solutions are being enriched by the infusion of increased data flows from previously disparate sub-systems and other information sources on and off the aircraft. Overall, it is possible for substantial cost savings, in addition to greater ancillary revenues, to be realised from robust implementation of connected aircraft applications. All of this has been made possible by what can be described as a perfect storm of conditions. Today, almost a third of the world’s total commercial active fleet has in-flight connectivity (IFC) and new, high capacity solutions promise to push further the boundaries of what the connected aircraft can achieve. Service providers are seeking to eliminate choke points and make the very best of available bandwidth by using the latest and greatest equipment such as highly efficient modems, intelligent wireless access points (WAPs) and more powerful server units. There is also huge interest in better performing flat panel antennas that promise to minimise fuel burn caused by drag. Additionally, next-generation aircraft like the 787 and A350 are flying data centres in all but name, generating huge amounts of data every flight by virtue of their very design. At the same time, commercial off the shelf (COTS) technology is rapidly evolving and airport surface data communications continue to improve. Consequently, a whole host of new services are springing up with software providers and application developers creating innovative solutions around many different parts of the connected aircraft to help optimise airline processes. In many ways, the current situation is somewhat reminiscent of the iPhone’s debut in 2007. Back then, few could have foreseen the birth of an app ecosystem that would allow consumers to pay for their groceries, call a cab and track it until its arrival, or even use their phone to turn on and off their lights from anywhere in the world. Indeed, the App Store wasn’t even launched until more than a year after the first iPhone. Undoubtedly, new applications will be dreamt up that make even seasoned industry veterans stand up and say “I wish I’d thought of that!”. Stakeholders therefore need to be agile and both ready and able to support analysis of trends they cannot yet envisage in order to quickly react to new service opportunities as they present themselves. There are several challenges still to overcome before the industry can reap the rewards of the connected aircraft. First, airlines are undoubtedly confused about connectivity. Suppliers have invested considerable amounts in developing differentiated offerings and this lack of standards has resulted in deep concern about investing in the wrong technology. Second, there exists little in the way of tangible metrics that show how quickly a return on investment (ROI) may be achieved from connected aircraft applications. Third, there is a perception that the act of harnessing vast amounts of data results in magical value with some having overstated the reality of what is possible. Myths around cybersecurity and real-time connectivity also persist. Worries that aircraft can be hacked into and remotely flown off course are probably unfounded (but by no means trivial), while there should be a recognition that offloading data from aircraft in real-time may only be necessary if you can also act on that data in real-time. Fourth, airline departments are notorious for being siloed in their thinking and this can make entire operations much less efficient. If an airline is trying to build the business case for the connected aircraft based on a single application, it will struggle. At the same time, there also needs to be a realisation that this is not an all or nothing decision. Applications can be phased in over time just as long as there is a comprehensive plan in place to do so. Clearly, there is no one-size-fits-all approach to the connected aircraft but most operators are looking for relatively simple first steps that are not too heavy on the implementation side. EFB lends itself well to fairly easy exploitation of “low-hanging fruit” with live weather being perhaps the simplest application to get started with. The elimination of “sneaker net” and paper-based approaches will also be on top of the to-do list for a number of carriers. Most airlines have separated engineering from IT and so forth but they are going to have to find a way to blend them back together if they are to make a success of the connected aircraft. Building internal consensus should be a primary goal for carriers and strong consideration must be given to the creation of a central leadership function that sits atop organisational siloes to ensure projects are not slowed by different levels of influence and bureaucracy. This may reduce interdepartmental friction that exists because of markedly different goals and cost centres. Further, successful operators will need to acquire skills that can leverage big data. Good data scientists, in particular, do not just address business problems, they pick the right problems that, when solved, have the most value to an organisation. External collaboration, too, will be critical to success in the connected aircraft market. Airlines, though sometimes somewhat isolationist by nature for competitive reasons, will naturally come together first via alliances and also, at key industry conferences to share best practices and lessons learned. To be seen as trusted partners to engage with, suppliers will also need to collaborate as the current lack of interoperability will surely not be tolerated indefinitely. A clear role exists for connectivity service providers and other entities not only to help airlines manage legacy systems and integration issues, but to foster the development of open architecture and industry standards that will expand choice and drive this sector forwards. The issue of cybersecurity will absolutely need to be addressed from multiple standpoints with those outside of the industry certain to be involved – especially as the adoption of COTS technology has opened up the world of aviation to a myriad of other systems. Signs are that connectivity service providers, many of which have backed into the connected aircraft arena by happenstance, are making the right moves in this regard. Gogo, for example, has partnered with Ultramain Systems, PACE and The Weather Company, Global Eagle Entertainment (GEE) has acquired masFlight and navAero, Panasonic Avionics Corporation is working closely with Teledyne Controls and ViaSat recently purchased Arconics. The likes of Rockwell Collins and SITAONAIR, meanwhile, are cognisant of the need to make an array of connected aircraft applications work – no matter the provider – and are thus positioning themselves as one-stop shops able to handle integration and act as single entities capable of managing an airline’s data needs. Interestingly, the passenger is the entry criteria for many airlines and most have either deployed, or announced plans to deploy IFC by now. Many are mid-way through implementation and just figuring out how the existence of this new capability will impact on different job roles. A better picture of how connected aircraft applications can result in efficiency gains will not become clear until deployment of connectivity is complete, or near-complete. This is one of the reasons the likes of Delta Air Lines, Southwest Airlines and Emirates are perhaps considered to be more so at the bleeding edge than others. Nevertheless, every airline will have a connected aircraft strategy in future. The question is whether it will be due to foresight and careful consideration of the challenges that currently exist or as a recovery measure by those that did not start their planning early enough. Valour Consultancy's latest report “How the Connected Aircraft fits into the Internet of Things” provides an up-to-date “helicopter” view of the technical opportunities, the challenges that currently act as a barrier to further adoption of connected aircraft applications and what needs to be done to help airlines and others take advantage of a revolution that is set to re-shape airline businesses and reinvent the passenger experience. It builds upon the company’s highly-acclaimed research into the passenger in-flight connectivity and in-flight entertainment markets. For an information brochure containing a full table of contents, click the above link. [/fusion_text][/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]