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Drone Delivery Deluge

Sometimes when we watch an action movie, we see our heroes struggling along a mountainside and suddenly one or two little pebbles roll down in front of them. It’s a cinematic shortcut to let us know that a landslide is coming. The pebbles have started falling down the mountain of potential that is UAV delivery.

The first signs of the impending avalanche were vital supplies of medicine and blood in hard-to-reach villages in Africa and Honduras. Postal Services in Switzerland and Singapore quickly saw the potential for streamlining their operations with drone deliveries and then came socks in the Silicon Valley, Peri-Peri Chicken and a Chicken and Cranberry pizza in Whangaparaoa (that’s in New Zealand), slurpees in Reno, burritos in Blacksburg and lately, a bag of popcorn and a Fire TV control in Cambridge (in UK) – from order to delivery took 13 minutes.

In logistics, the last mile – the delivery from the final distribution centre to the point of use or sale – has always been troublesome as it consumes costly man-hours and clogs up traffic networks with polluting vehicles. As a rule of thumb, this last leg of the delivery costs 28% of the total cost of delivery. The burgeoning on-line retail sector in the UK has roughly doubled since 2010 when it stood at 10% of total retail sales. In the US, the figure is expected to be about 14% of retail sales will be made on-line and all of these will be delivered.

Delivery is low paid work in hazardous conditions and has hitherto been accomplished in the main by ‘self-employed’ contractors to a delivery service. Long gone are the days of the young lad on his bicycle delivering the shopping around the village. Recent actions by these delivery contractors for guaranteed wages, holidays and other worker’s rights lead the industry to believe that cheap delivery by humans will soon become non-viable.

Why is drone delivery likely to become the next ‘big thing’? Simply put, because it is doing precisely what automation was intended to do, replacing humans doing an unpleasant and low-paid job. At the moment the USA is lagging behind other countries that are allowing, nay encouraging, drone delivery services. Considering the potential time-saving, cost-saving and pollution reduction, it won’t be long before the FAA has to address a growing clamour to facilitate this industry.

The potential value of business in this sector in the US and Europe could easily be in the tens of billions of dollars. It has been difficult to find definitive figures but in 2015, it was reported a statistic research vendor that pizza delivery alone accounted for $9.7 billion; it is assumed that this figure includes the cost of the pizza and the box it rode in on. It doesn’t really matter, as the potential for drone delivery dwarfs all other services that drones might perform.

Of course, all the deliveries that have been done so far have been undertaken by drones in line-of-sight of the operator and in good daylight conditions. Replacing a relatively low-cost boy-on-a-bike with a slightly more expensive drone pilot does not make economic sense. If the industry is to flourish, then more trials need to be undertaken with operators remote from the delivery point, at dusk or later in the evening and possibly with the drone (or multiple drones) in autonomous mode. And once those trials have been successfully accomplished, then regulators need to adjust their position to accommodate this blossoming service industry.

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It’s a cinematic shortcut to let us know that a landslide is coming. The pebbles have started falling down the mountain of potential that is UAV delivery. The first signs of the impending avalanche were vital supplies of medicine and blood in hard-to-reach villages in Africa and Honduras. Postal Services in Switzerland and Singapore quickly saw the potential for streamlining their operations with drone deliveries and then came socks in the Silicon Valley, Peri-Peri Chicken and a Chicken and Cranberry pizza in Whangaparaoa (that’s in New Zealand), slurpees in Reno, burritos in Blacksburg and lately, a bag of popcorn and a Fire TV control in Cambridge (in UK) – from order to delivery took 13 minutes. In logistics, the last mile – the delivery from the final distribution centre to the point of use or sale – has always been troublesome as it consumes costly man-hours and clogs up traffic networks with polluting vehicles. As a rule of thumb, this last leg of the delivery costs 28% of the total cost of delivery. The burgeoning on-line retail sector in the UK has roughly doubled since 2010 when it stood at 10% of total retail sales. In the US, the figure is expected to be about 14% of retail sales will be made on-line and all of these will be delivered. Delivery is low paid work in hazardous conditions and has hitherto been accomplished in the main by ‘self-employed’ contractors to a delivery service. Long gone are the days of the young lad on his bicycle delivering the shopping around the village. Recent actions by these delivery contractors for guaranteed wages, holidays and other worker’s rights lead the industry to believe that cheap delivery by humans will soon become non-viable. Why is drone delivery likely to become the next ‘big thing’? Simply put, because it is doing precisely what automation was intended to do, replacing humans doing an unpleasant and low-paid job. At the moment the USA is lagging behind other countries that are allowing, nay encouraging, drone delivery services. Considering the potential time-saving, cost-saving and pollution reduction, it won’t be long before the FAA has to address a growing clamour to facilitate this industry. The potential value of business in this sector in the US and Europe could easily be in the tens of billions of dollars. It has been difficult to find definitive figures but in 2015, it was reported a statistic research vendor that pizza delivery alone accounted for $9.7 billion; it is assumed that this figure includes the cost of the pizza and the box it rode in on. It doesn’t really matter, as the potential for drone delivery dwarfs all other services that drones might perform. Of course, all the deliveries that have been done so far have been undertaken by drones in line-of-sight of the operator and in good daylight conditions. Replacing a relatively low-cost boy-on-a-bike with a slightly more expensive drone pilot does not make economic sense. If the industry is to flourish, then more trials need to be undertaken with operators remote from the delivery point, at dusk or later in the evening and possibly with the drone (or multiple drones) in autonomous mode. And once those trials have been successfully accomplished, then regulators need to adjust their position to accommodate this blossoming service industry. [/fusion_text][/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]

Product Review of Yamay HR Activity Tracker

Overall Description

Although activity fitness trackers have been around for some time, I have recently felt compelled to start using them. Many people will argue the various benefits and useless features of this new emerging fitness device genre.

How much do we really gain by knowing you plodded 10,000 steps in a day?  I simply wanted a tool that measures my overall activity exertions on a day to day basic. This was a case of making sure I rested sufficiently after my training during the week and ensuring I hit certain activity levels.

A little bit about myself, I am in my early thirties, very active, predominantly gym-based. My training is 70% geared to weight lifting, strength based, and 30% cardio vascular training, mixed between high intensity training (HIT) and solid state cardio. I also plan to take part in a 500m rowing competition soon.

Purchasing the Yamay Fitness tracker was straightforward, directly through Amazon, and in my opinion, the tracker was one of the best for features versus price. Sadly, my first activity tracker had an issue with connecting to the mobile app. I believe this may have been a faulty Bluetooth chipset as my replacement tracker, which arrived three working days after my complaint, connected fine with the app. One concerning quality issue with the two trackers, the faulty first one, although it wasn’t connected to my smartphone, the battery drained in less than five days, whilst the second tracker which was connected, lasts over ten days.

Strengths

  • The tracker is extremely price competitive (£24.99). Compare it to the Fitbit Charge HR, which cost between £80-90, making you realise what great value for money it is.
  • Style is pretty nice and the clasp, although simple, is effective.
  • Many people will argue any margin of error is bad, however, 2.32% margin of error for a wrist based tracker, I believe to be very good. This statistic is for walking/running only. If I were to use it for tracking my training at the gym, the margin of error would be much higher.
  • The active heart rate monitor is inaccurate. It generally gets resting heart rate but I would not use the device for training required for heart rate zones.
  • Sleep tracking is good.
  • The accompanying app (Very Fit 2.0) is also free, but could do with several improvements.
  • Battery life is 10-12 days on average.

Weakness

  • Doesn’t record rowing as an activity or other gym exercises like free weight training, machine weights or other exercises like press ups, pull ups, sit ups..
  • Bluetooth did not work on the initial tracker.
  • Regarding the accompanying app, its takes several minutes for the app to sync with my watch. Additionally, the analysis features need some work. I set a target of 11,000 steps per day however, a horizontal broken line always remains at the 10,000 step mark.
  • A breakout for different activity levels would be much more useful – running to walking, even cycling.
  • The wrist sense is an erratic feature. It is particularly annoyed when trying to sleep at night, and the tracker’s LED display lightens up because it thinks you’re awake.
  • No general wellness score that could help gauge users on their health for the day.

 Opportunities

  •  Although hardly a revelation for trackers, the call alarm, and alert have proved useful. It has certainly stopped me missing a number of calls from my girlfriend that I normally miss. The positive or negative nature of this improvement is debatable however. Developing these types of uses, will augment the Yamay’s product offering.
  • Improve tracker capabilities and different exercise types.

Threats

  • Tracker will quickly become antiquated as new features are included high-end trackers making this device look obsolete.
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[fusion_builder_container hundred_percent="no" equal_height_columns="no" menu_anchor="" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" class="" id="" background_color="" background_image="" background_position="center center" background_repeat="no-repeat" fade="no" background_parallax="none" parallax_speed="0.3" video_mp4="" video_webm="" video_ogv="" video_url="" video_aspect_ratio="16:9" video_loop="yes" video_mute="yes" overlay_color="" video_preview_image="" border_size="" border_color="" border_style="solid" padding_top="" padding_bottom="" padding_left="" padding_right=""][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type="1_1" layout="1_1" background_position="left top" background_color="" border_size="" border_color="" border_style="solid" border_position="all" spacing="yes" background_image="" background_repeat="no-repeat" padding_top="" padding_right="" padding_bottom="" padding_left="" margin_top="0px" margin_bottom="0px" class="" id="" animation_type="" animation_speed="0.3" animation_direction="left" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" center_content="no" last="no" min_height="" hover_type="none" link=""][fusion_imageframe image_id="5042|full" max_width="" style_type="" blur="" stylecolor="" hover_type="none" bordersize="" bordercolor="" borderradius="" align="center" lightbox="no" gallery_id="" lightbox_image="" lightbox_image_id="" alt="" link="" linktarget="_self" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" class="" id="" animation_type="" animation_direction="left" animation_speed="0.3" animation_offset=""]http://217.199.187.200/valourconsultancy.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/Yamay-Combo-1024x845-1.png[/fusion_imageframe][fusion_separator style_type="default" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" class="" id="" sep_color="#ffffff" top_margin="20" bottom_margin="20" border_size="" icon="" icon_circle="" icon_circle_color="" width="" alignment="center" /][fusion_text] Overall Description Although activity fitness trackers have been around for some time, I have recently felt compelled to start using them. Many people will argue the various benefits and useless features of this new emerging fitness device genre. How much do we really gain by knowing you plodded 10,000 steps in a day?  I simply wanted a tool that measures my overall activity exertions on a day to day basic. This was a case of making sure I rested sufficiently after my training during the week and ensuring I hit certain activity levels. A little bit about myself, I am in my early thirties, very active, predominantly gym-based. My training is 70% geared to weight lifting, strength based, and 30% cardio vascular training, mixed between high intensity training (HIT) and solid state cardio. I also plan to take part in a 500m rowing competition soon. Purchasing the Yamay Fitness tracker was straightforward, directly through Amazon, and in my opinion, the tracker was one of the best for features versus price. Sadly, my first activity tracker had an issue with connecting to the mobile app. I believe this may have been a faulty Bluetooth chipset as my replacement tracker, which arrived three working days after my complaint, connected fine with the app. One concerning quality issue with the two trackers, the faulty first one, although it wasn’t connected to my smartphone, the battery drained in less than five days, whilst the second tracker which was connected, lasts over ten days. Strengths
  • The tracker is extremely price competitive (£24.99). Compare it to the Fitbit Charge HR, which cost between £80-90, making you realise what great value for money it is.
  • Style is pretty nice and the clasp, although simple, is effective.
  • Many people will argue any margin of error is bad, however, 2.32% margin of error for a wrist based tracker, I believe to be very good. This statistic is for walking/running only. If I were to use it for tracking my training at the gym, the margin of error would be much higher.
  • The active heart rate monitor is inaccurate. It generally gets resting heart rate but I would not use the device for training required for heart rate zones.
  • Sleep tracking is good.
  • The accompanying app (Very Fit 2.0) is also free, but could do with several improvements.
  • Battery life is 10-12 days on average.
Weakness
  • Doesn’t record rowing as an activity or other gym exercises like free weight training, machine weights or other exercises like press ups, pull ups, sit ups..
  • Bluetooth did not work on the initial tracker.
  • Regarding the accompanying app, its takes several minutes for the app to sync with my watch. Additionally, the analysis features need some work. I set a target of 11,000 steps per day however, a horizontal broken line always remains at the 10,000 step mark.
  • A breakout for different activity levels would be much more useful – running to walking, even cycling.
  • The wrist sense is an erratic feature. It is particularly annoyed when trying to sleep at night, and the tracker’s LED display lightens up because it thinks you’re awake.
  • No general wellness score that could help gauge users on their health for the day.
 Opportunities
  •  Although hardly a revelation for trackers, the call alarm, and alert have proved useful. It has certainly stopped me missing a number of calls from my girlfriend that I normally miss. The positive or negative nature of this improvement is debatable however. Developing these types of uses, will augment the Yamay’s product offering.
  • Improve tracker capabilities and different exercise types.
Threats
  • Tracker will quickly become antiquated as new features are included high-end trackers making this device look obsolete.
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