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Calm Seas and Smooth Surfing

Author: Steve Flood and Josh Flood

This is all in the future. But what about the future future? Almost all the projects described in the last article, bar one or two, are retrofits of existing vessels. They are the projects of specialist technologically advanced consortia. As the demand for autonomous shipping grips the maritime fleet owners, they will look to the shipyards to incorporate the sensors, controls and communications equipment in their newbuilds.

Larger fleet owners such as Maersk, COSCO, Hapag-Lloyd and MSC will be able to write exacting specifications when they approach a shipyard to build 5 or 10 autonomous vessels. Over 40% of the tonnage of trading vessels in the world consists of dry bulk carriers which are ideal for automisation, as are the 28% that are oil tankers and the 13% that are container ships. CSIC, Mitsubishi, Hyundai, STX and DSME shipyards will have the resources and be happy to comply with the requirements of the heavy hitters in the Merchant Navy.

Smaller fleet operators, say, with less than ten vessels, who order ships individually, will expect the shipyard to supply the automisation. The Korean and Singaporean yards already have smart ship projects underway, as do Mitsubishi in Japan. Yards in China, other yards in Japan and elsewhere will have to bring in expertise. Hyundai’s collaboration with Accenture to develop OceanLink is described as a ‘smart ship’ platform for the shipbuilding, shipping, and onshore-logistics sectors. Daewoo (DSME) shipyard has received Approval in Principle (AiP) from Lloyd’s Register for its collaboration with Korean marine system experts, marineworks, who use KVH communication systems for its smart ship solution (DS4) for new container ships.

Without completely destroying the romance, it is possible to describe a merchant ship as a big box with a large engine driving the propeller. To look after the engine, there is an engine control room into which all the parameters of the engine and ancillary equipment are fed and where activities can be scheduled to keep everything running in a tickety-boo fashion. To keep the ship heading in the right direction, there is a bridge or navigation control room somewhere up high where the helmsman can see the horizon.

Experience with drones has suggested that there is no need for the pilot to sit at the sharp end of a plane but can operate his vehicle from the comfort of his armchair in Texas. In the same way, the chief engineer need not man the engine control room aboard his ship nor the skipper pace the bridge. The major difference between a drone and a cargo ship is the sheer volume of data. Even in the most basic of cargo ships there will be hundreds of sensors on the engines and ancillary equipment plus CCTV, fire alarms, gas detectors, stress measurements, safety systems etc. The bridge will be equally bedecked with data points and all these are connected by tens of miles of wiring.

Admittedly the vast majority of data travelling these wires does not need to be transmitted instantaneously to any remote control room. Warnings, alarms and requests for action do need to be addressed in short order and there are plenty of these, even in the most well-maintained and efficient of ships. It may be considered that artificial intelligence (AI) can sort through these and deal with the most routine. Technically competent engineers and seamen who have not only the knowledge and experience to understand the potential problems and understand the coding needed to deal with this, in AI, are relatively rare. For this reason alone, progress needs to be considerate and systems commissioned to deal with failure and not just to comply with rules and specifications.

Typically a smart ship system can be described as an array of modules each designed to do the job once done by seamen. The accumulated data derived from the observations, decisions and actions of these pseudo-cyber-seamen modules can amount to Terabytes per hour. If live-streaming CCTV is added, there is going to be a need for a large amount of communication capacity.

And then there is the problem of the communication infrastructure – Low Earth Orbit (LEO) arrays such as Iridium, OneWeb, LeoSat, O3b and Elon Musk’s Starlink promise the potential of significant data transfer. Indeed, Samsung published a paper in 2015 proposal suggesting the provision of a Zetabyte/month capacity which is equivalent to 200GB/month for 5 Billion users worldwide. The problem for such a proposal is underutilisation. Such satellites orbit the earth every two hours and, of that, spend about one third over populated areas where they are used fully.

Geostationary arrays, such as Inmarsat, Intelsat and Echostar, and Medium Earth orbit arrays such as Galileo, GPS and GLONASS are positioned for populous areas but also have spare time on their antennae. To fully utilise these arrays, there needs to be users around the globe and the oceans have a relative dearth of need.

A quick look at marine traffic (www.marinetraffic.com) on an unremarkable Sunday 21st July 2019 shows that there are over 200,000 marine vessels large enough to be fitted with an AIS tracker sailing the oceans blue. All of these are currently being tracked by satellite. Admittedly they don’t send a lot of data back home, just enough for tracking purposes. If they were all smart or smartish, then there is a need for a large data pipeline back to headquarters.

The serendipitous, or not so serendipitous, advancement of autonomous shipping and satellite communication has potentially many benefits – cheaper trade, safer ships (it is estimated that 75 to 96% of shipping accidents involve human error), less pollution, greater fuel efficiency – one research project by MUNIN (Maritime Unmanned Navigation through Intelligence in Networks) predicted savings of over $7m over a 25-year period per autonomous vessel in fuel consumption and crew supplies and salaries.

Of course, there are downsides, for instance, a large initial capital expenditure in technology, not only for the ship itself, but also of onshore operations to monitor fleet movements. There is also the danger that occurs during in any transition between current manned marine fleet and any unmanned vessel. A lack of crew will also make maintenance of moving parts incredibly difficult on long voyages and breakdowns could result in significant delays.

Something that is scantly regarded is the removal of benefit of international inter-reaction. Each of these ships will have crews of international origin. This is estimated at 1,647,500 seafarers, of which 774,000 are officers and 873,500 are ratings. China, the Philippines, Indonesia, the Russian Federation and Ukraine are the five largest nationalities of all seafarers (officers and ratings). The Philippines is the biggest supplier of ratings, followed by China, Indonesia, the Russian Federation and Ukraine. While China is the biggest supplier of officers, followed by the Philippines, India, Indonesia and the Russian Federation. These crews rub along quite well generally, and as one who has spent some time at sea, the writer can state that one of the great pleasures of sea-time (and one of the great annoyances) is inter-reacting with all the foreign crew members and learning about their culture and cuisine.

However autonomous shipping is steaming over the horizon and it must be welcomed into port if our general prosperity is to increase. The really interesting time comes after autonomous shipping when AI takes over the logistics and trading, assessing cargo prices and starts re-routing ships to maximise profit.

For more information on Valour Consultancy’s maritime connectivity, digital applications, cybersecurity, autonomous maritime vessel and other maritime reports, please contact   info@valourconsultancy.com and “Maritime Research” in the subject line.

 

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[fusion_builder_container hundred_percent="no" equal_height_columns="no" menu_anchor="" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" class="" id="" background_color="" background_image="" background_position="center center" background_repeat="no-repeat" fade="no" background_parallax="none" parallax_speed="0.3" video_mp4="" video_webm="" video_ogv="" video_url="" video_aspect_ratio="16:9" video_loop="yes" video_mute="yes" overlay_color="" video_preview_image="" border_size="" border_color="" border_style="solid" padding_top="" padding_bottom="" padding_left="" padding_right=""][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type="1_1" layout="1_1" background_position="left top" background_color="" border_size="" border_color="" border_style="solid" border_position="all" spacing="yes" background_image="" background_repeat="no-repeat" padding_top="" padding_right="" padding_bottom="" padding_left="" margin_top="0px" margin_bottom="0px" class="" id="" animation_type="" animation_speed="0.3" animation_direction="left" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" center_content="no" last="no" min_height="" hover_type="none" link=""][fusion_imageframe image_id="4774|full" max_width="" style_type="" blur="" stylecolor="" hover_type="none" bordersize="" bordercolor="" borderradius="" align="none" lightbox="no" gallery_id="" lightbox_image="" lightbox_image_id="" alt="" link="" linktarget="_self" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" class="" id="" animation_type="" animation_direction="left" animation_speed="0.3" animation_offset=""]http://217.199.187.200/valourconsultancy.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/Calm-Seas-and-Smooth-Sailing-1.jpg[/fusion_imageframe][fusion_text] Author: Steve Flood and Josh Flood This is all in the future. But what about the future future? Almost all the projects described in the last article, bar one or two, are retrofits of existing vessels. They are the projects of specialist technologically advanced consortia. As the demand for autonomous shipping grips the maritime fleet owners, they will look to the shipyards to incorporate the sensors, controls and communications equipment in their newbuilds. Larger fleet owners such as Maersk, COSCO, Hapag-Lloyd and MSC will be able to write exacting specifications when they approach a shipyard to build 5 or 10 autonomous vessels. Over 40% of the tonnage of trading vessels in the world consists of dry bulk carriers which are ideal for automisation, as are the 28% that are oil tankers and the 13% that are container ships. CSIC, Mitsubishi, Hyundai, STX and DSME shipyards will have the resources and be happy to comply with the requirements of the heavy hitters in the Merchant Navy. Smaller fleet operators, say, with less than ten vessels, who order ships individually, will expect the shipyard to supply the automisation. The Korean and Singaporean yards already have smart ship projects underway, as do Mitsubishi in Japan. Yards in China, other yards in Japan and elsewhere will have to bring in expertise. Hyundai’s collaboration with Accenture to develop OceanLink is described as a ‘smart ship’ platform for the shipbuilding, shipping, and onshore-logistics sectors. Daewoo (DSME) shipyard has received Approval in Principle (AiP) from Lloyd’s Register for its collaboration with Korean marine system experts, marineworks, who use KVH communication systems for its smart ship solution (DS4) for new container ships. Without completely destroying the romance, it is possible to describe a merchant ship as a big box with a large engine driving the propeller. To look after the engine, there is an engine control room into which all the parameters of the engine and ancillary equipment are fed and where activities can be scheduled to keep everything running in a tickety-boo fashion. To keep the ship heading in the right direction, there is a bridge or navigation control room somewhere up high where the helmsman can see the horizon. Experience with drones has suggested that there is no need for the pilot to sit at the sharp end of a plane but can operate his vehicle from the comfort of his armchair in Texas. In the same way, the chief engineer need not man the engine control room aboard his ship nor the skipper pace the bridge. The major difference between a drone and a cargo ship is the sheer volume of data. Even in the most basic of cargo ships there will be hundreds of sensors on the engines and ancillary equipment plus CCTV, fire alarms, gas detectors, stress measurements, safety systems etc. The bridge will be equally bedecked with data points and all these are connected by tens of miles of wiring. Admittedly the vast majority of data travelling these wires does not need to be transmitted instantaneously to any remote control room. Warnings, alarms and requests for action do need to be addressed in short order and there are plenty of these, even in the most well-maintained and efficient of ships. It may be considered that artificial intelligence (AI) can sort through these and deal with the most routine. Technically competent engineers and seamen who have not only the knowledge and experience to understand the potential problems and understand the coding needed to deal with this, in AI, are relatively rare. For this reason alone, progress needs to be considerate and systems commissioned to deal with failure and not just to comply with rules and specifications. Typically a smart ship system can be described as an array of modules each designed to do the job once done by seamen. The accumulated data derived from the observations, decisions and actions of these pseudo-cyber-seamen modules can amount to Terabytes per hour. If live-streaming CCTV is added, there is going to be a need for a large amount of communication capacity. And then there is the problem of the communication infrastructure – Low Earth Orbit (LEO) arrays such as Iridium, OneWeb, LeoSat, O3b and Elon Musk’s Starlink promise the potential of significant data transfer. Indeed, Samsung published a paper in 2015 proposal suggesting the provision of a Zetabyte/month capacity which is equivalent to 200GB/month for 5 Billion users worldwide. The problem for such a proposal is underutilisation. Such satellites orbit the earth every two hours and, of that, spend about one third over populated areas where they are used fully. Geostationary arrays, such as Inmarsat, Intelsat and Echostar, and Medium Earth orbit arrays such as Galileo, GPS and GLONASS are positioned for populous areas but also have spare time on their antennae. To fully utilise these arrays, there needs to be users around the globe and the oceans have a relative dearth of need. A quick look at marine traffic (www.marinetraffic.com) on an unremarkable Sunday 21st July 2019 shows that there are over 200,000 marine vessels large enough to be fitted with an AIS tracker sailing the oceans blue. All of these are currently being tracked by satellite. Admittedly they don’t send a lot of data back home, just enough for tracking purposes. If they were all smart or smartish, then there is a need for a large data pipeline back to headquarters. The serendipitous, or not so serendipitous, advancement of autonomous shipping and satellite communication has potentially many benefits – cheaper trade, safer ships (it is estimated that 75 to 96% of shipping accidents involve human error), less pollution, greater fuel efficiency – one research project by MUNIN (Maritime Unmanned Navigation through Intelligence in Networks) predicted savings of over $7m over a 25-year period per autonomous vessel in fuel consumption and crew supplies and salaries. Of course, there are downsides, for instance, a large initial capital expenditure in technology, not only for the ship itself, but also of onshore operations to monitor fleet movements. There is also the danger that occurs during in any transition between current manned marine fleet and any unmanned vessel. A lack of crew will also make maintenance of moving parts incredibly difficult on long voyages and breakdowns could result in significant delays. Something that is scantly regarded is the removal of benefit of international inter-reaction. Each of these ships will have crews of international origin. This is estimated at 1,647,500 seafarers, of which 774,000 are officers and 873,500 are ratings. China, the Philippines, Indonesia, the Russian Federation and Ukraine are the five largest nationalities of all seafarers (officers and ratings). The Philippines is the biggest supplier of ratings, followed by China, Indonesia, the Russian Federation and Ukraine. While China is the biggest supplier of officers, followed by the Philippines, India, Indonesia and the Russian Federation. These crews rub along quite well generally, and as one who has spent some time at sea, the writer can state that one of the great pleasures of sea-time (and one of the great annoyances) is inter-reacting with all the foreign crew members and learning about their culture and cuisine. However autonomous shipping is steaming over the horizon and it must be welcomed into port if our general prosperity is to increase. The really interesting time comes after autonomous shipping when AI takes over the logistics and trading, assessing cargo prices and starts re-routing ships to maximise profit. For more information on Valour Consultancy’s maritime connectivity, digital applications, cybersecurity, autonomous maritime vessel and other maritime reports, please contact   info@valourconsultancy.com and “Maritime Research” in the subject line.   [/fusion_text][/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]

More Compelling Use Cases Needed to Stimulate Next Wave of IFC Adoption

Earlier this year, I wrote an article which spoke about the industry entering a phase of action rather than talk as various service providers set to work on backlogs built up in recent years. This process began as 2017 came to a close and has continued throughout 2018. A notable and perhaps worrying side effect has been a relative lack of new IFC announcements compared to previous years. With 2019 predicted to be another quiet year as far as announcements go, the key question is why the slowdown and what is needed to bring back momentum?

The majority of early adopters and what might be considered “low hanging fruit” are already offering, or are in the process of rolling out IFC services. According to our quarterly IFC tracker, 91 airlines offered passenger Wi-Fi at the end of June 2018, with many more under contract. There are a significant number of commercial airlines still to target, but the pool of unconnected aircraft is becoming increasingly concentrated with operators that are unconvinced of the business case for IFC and/or cannot afford the upfront CAPEX and subsequent OPEX.

Swaying those that remain unconvinced would perhaps be easier with strong user-cases, but publicly available compelling examples exist today. It is reasonable to assume continued challenges around service consistency, passenger uptake and cost are a factor behind the lack of positive headlines. Average IFC take-rates continue to hover around 5-8% when a paid model is in place, which most airlines feel they must implement to recoup the costs associated with high ongoing service fees. This, in turn, dampens potential ancillary revenue generation from the sale of session passes. For those passengers willing to pay, service consistency is often not where it should be, compounding the issue and causing some airlines to shy away from marketing their IFC service to passengers. Not necessarily the headlines prospective airline customers want to hear.

Of the success stories that have gained traction, the case which arguably stands out the most is Jetblue’s free service with Viasat, mostly because it is one of a few that is endorsed by the airline, passengers and the industry. It also demonstrates how the airline monetised IFC, in this case through its (now scaled back) partnership with Amazon.

With new announcements seemingly on pause, there is a need for more success stories, but first airlines must define what monetising IFC looks like to them and build a strategy around that. It can be easy to assume the answer is for airlines to offer Wi-Fi for free to all passengers. Indeed, IFC take-rates tend to jump to up to around 40% when doing so. But sponsors are proving hard to convince (discussed below) and even if this weren’t the case, the economics of the freemium model doesn’t always stack up today. IFC services would become unusable or cost the airline a small fortune if every passenger on board was to connect. Such a situation would only add more strain on those in the middle layer of the IFC value chain.

Many airlines, therefore, face the decision of charging passengers to access the Internet or absorbing the cost associated with a free service. A tough one to explain to stakeholders looking for a quick return on investment (ROI) – especially now the price of jet fuel is once again marching northward. But airlines are finding ways to limit losses and at the same time find alternative ways to justify ROI beyond simply selling session passes. Some of these approaches are discussed below:

Retaining Top-Tier Customers

Many carriers offer free IFC to frequent and top-tier flyers as a value-added service. In this case, the cost of providing the free service is justified by passenger satisfaction metrics and repeat business.

Increase or Maintain Ticket Sales

More carriers, such as All Nippon Airways, NOK Air and Japan Airlines, offer free Wi-Fi specifically on short-haul/domestic flights to stand out in increasingly competitive local markets. In these circumstances, the cost of providing a free service is assumed to be absorbed in ticket sales.

Tiered Pricing

Where completely free services cannot be accommodated, airlines are deploying tiered packages that allow passengers to access low-bandwidth applications, such as messaging apps, or a “slower” connection for free. Charges are applied to access faster services. This model is similar to what we see on the ground, in hotels for example, and ensures passengers can still surf for free whilst costly data hogs are charged accordingly for using more data.

Sponsorship/Advertising Revenue

An ideal situation for airlines is generating a revenue stream from advertising or sponsorship. This is a path most airlines would like to take, however, very few have made this work. Brands will only come to the fore if they feel there will be enough eyeballs on the screen and this is challenging for airlines with small fleets and for those that achieve IFC take-rates in the low single-digits. Ironically, sponsorship typically frees up airlines to offer a free service in some capacity, increasing take rates and making it an even more attractive offer for brands. But getting over the initial hurdle of demonstrating the ROI to potential advertisers and sponsors is a difficult task.

Cost Savings Through Operational Efficiencies

Some airlines are beginning to offset the cost of providing IFC by moving operational data, such as real-time weather updates, maintenance data and real-time payment verification, over the passenger connectivity pipe. Similarly, crew devices are being connected so that CRM databases can be mined in real-time to enhance the passenger experience and leave a lasting impression. Despite much commentary around the large operational savings that can be made through IFC, few airlines are advanced in their approach to the connected aircraft. But that will change over time and we expect the nose-to-tail story to increasingly resonate – especially amongst notoriously cost-conscious LCCs. Any IFC system that can promise significant savings, or ‘pay for itself’ will almost certainly be of interest.

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[fusion_builder_container hundred_percent="no" equal_height_columns="no" menu_anchor="" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" class="" id="" background_color="" background_image="" background_position="center center" background_repeat="no-repeat" fade="no" background_parallax="none" parallax_speed="0.3" video_mp4="" video_webm="" video_ogv="" video_url="" video_aspect_ratio="16:9" video_loop="yes" video_mute="yes" overlay_color="" video_preview_image="" border_size="" border_color="" border_style="solid" padding_top="" padding_bottom="" padding_left="" padding_right=""][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type="1_1" layout="1_1" background_position="left top" background_color="" border_size="" border_color="" border_style="solid" border_position="all" spacing="yes" background_image="" background_repeat="no-repeat" padding_top="" padding_right="" padding_bottom="" padding_left="" margin_top="0px" margin_bottom="0px" class="" id="" animation_type="" animation_speed="0.3" animation_direction="left" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" center_content="no" last="no" min_height="" hover_type="none" link=""][fusion_imageframe image_id="4858|full" max_width="" style_type="" blur="" stylecolor="" hover_type="none" bordersize="" bordercolor="" borderradius="" align="center" lightbox="no" gallery_id="" lightbox_image="" lightbox_image_id="" alt="" link="" linktarget="_self" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" class="" id="" animation_type="" animation_direction="left" animation_speed="0.3" animation_offset=""]http://217.199.187.200/valourconsultancy.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/plane-841441_1280-min-1024x680-1.jpg[/fusion_imageframe][fusion_separator style_type="default" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" class="" id="" sep_color="#ffffff" top_margin="20" bottom_margin="20" border_size="" icon="" icon_circle="" icon_circle_color="" width="" alignment="center" /][fusion_text]Earlier this year, I wrote an article which spoke about the industry entering a phase of action rather than talk as various service providers set to work on backlogs built up in recent years. This process began as 2017 came to a close and has continued throughout 2018. A notable and perhaps worrying side effect has been a relative lack of new IFC announcements compared to previous years. With 2019 predicted to be another quiet year as far as announcements go, the key question is why the slowdown and what is needed to bring back momentum? The majority of early adopters and what might be considered “low hanging fruit” are already offering, or are in the process of rolling out IFC services. According to our quarterly IFC tracker, 91 airlines offered passenger Wi-Fi at the end of June 2018, with many more under contract. There are a significant number of commercial airlines still to target, but the pool of unconnected aircraft is becoming increasingly concentrated with operators that are unconvinced of the business case for IFC and/or cannot afford the upfront CAPEX and subsequent OPEX. Swaying those that remain unconvinced would perhaps be easier with strong user-cases, but publicly available compelling examples exist today. It is reasonable to assume continued challenges around service consistency, passenger uptake and cost are a factor behind the lack of positive headlines. Average IFC take-rates continue to hover around 5-8% when a paid model is in place, which most airlines feel they must implement to recoup the costs associated with high ongoing service fees. This, in turn, dampens potential ancillary revenue generation from the sale of session passes. For those passengers willing to pay, service consistency is often not where it should be, compounding the issue and causing some airlines to shy away from marketing their IFC service to passengers. Not necessarily the headlines prospective airline customers want to hear. Of the success stories that have gained traction, the case which arguably stands out the most is Jetblue’s free service with Viasat, mostly because it is one of a few that is endorsed by the airline, passengers and the industry. It also demonstrates how the airline monetised IFC, in this case through its (now scaled back) partnership with Amazon. With new announcements seemingly on pause, there is a need for more success stories, but first airlines must define what monetising IFC looks like to them and build a strategy around that. It can be easy to assume the answer is for airlines to offer Wi-Fi for free to all passengers. Indeed, IFC take-rates tend to jump to up to around 40% when doing so. But sponsors are proving hard to convince (discussed below) and even if this weren’t the case, the economics of the freemium model doesn’t always stack up today. IFC services would become unusable or cost the airline a small fortune if every passenger on board was to connect. Such a situation would only add more strain on those in the middle layer of the IFC value chain. Many airlines, therefore, face the decision of charging passengers to access the Internet or absorbing the cost associated with a free service. A tough one to explain to stakeholders looking for a quick return on investment (ROI) – especially now the price of jet fuel is once again marching northward. But airlines are finding ways to limit losses and at the same time find alternative ways to justify ROI beyond simply selling session passes. Some of these approaches are discussed below: Retaining Top-Tier Customers Many carriers offer free IFC to frequent and top-tier flyers as a value-added service. In this case, the cost of providing the free service is justified by passenger satisfaction metrics and repeat business. Increase or Maintain Ticket Sales More carriers, such as All Nippon Airways, NOK Air and Japan Airlines, offer free Wi-Fi specifically on short-haul/domestic flights to stand out in increasingly competitive local markets. In these circumstances, the cost of providing a free service is assumed to be absorbed in ticket sales. Tiered Pricing Where completely free services cannot be accommodated, airlines are deploying tiered packages that allow passengers to access low-bandwidth applications, such as messaging apps, or a “slower” connection for free. Charges are applied to access faster services. This model is similar to what we see on the ground, in hotels for example, and ensures passengers can still surf for free whilst costly data hogs are charged accordingly for using more data. Sponsorship/Advertising Revenue An ideal situation for airlines is generating a revenue stream from advertising or sponsorship. This is a path most airlines would like to take, however, very few have made this work. Brands will only come to the fore if they feel there will be enough eyeballs on the screen and this is challenging for airlines with small fleets and for those that achieve IFC take-rates in the low single-digits. Ironically, sponsorship typically frees up airlines to offer a free service in some capacity, increasing take rates and making it an even more attractive offer for brands. But getting over the initial hurdle of demonstrating the ROI to potential advertisers and sponsors is a difficult task. Cost Savings Through Operational Efficiencies Some airlines are beginning to offset the cost of providing IFC by moving operational data, such as real-time weather updates, maintenance data and real-time payment verification, over the passenger connectivity pipe. Similarly, crew devices are being connected so that CRM databases can be mined in real-time to enhance the passenger experience and leave a lasting impression. Despite much commentary around the large operational savings that can be made through IFC, few airlines are advanced in their approach to the connected aircraft. But that will change over time and we expect the nose-to-tail story to increasingly resonate – especially amongst notoriously cost-conscious LCCs. Any IFC system that can promise significant savings, or ‘pay for itself’ will almost certainly be of interest.[/fusion_text][/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]

Debunking Misconceptions About Connectivity in The Maritime Industry

When Nautilus International – a global trade union and professional association for seafarers and other crew in the maritime industry – carried out their 2017 investigation into connectivity at sea, major attention was given to the quality of connectivity that crew have onboard.

In an era where connectivity is no longer an expectation but a norm, this survey found that 88% of crew were able to connect to the Internet regularly, which is an improvement for an industry that tends to embrace technology relatively slowly.

Communication anomalies against connectivity onboard

Not only had connectivity made an impact on crew’s attitude towards long-term employment opportunities and social issues, it also redefined human resources retaining policies in accordance with the Maritime Labor Convention adopted in 2006.

Yet, this survey reported some communication anomalies that maritime employers need to address if they are to improve the lives of those who work in remote locations.

Whilst 83% of companies commented that they were concerned that crew may download illegal or adult content, only 16% of crew reported unauthorised content as a main reason for not providing Internet access for personal use.

At a first glance, maritime employers appear to be reluctant to the provision of onboard connectivity for cyber-security reasons, but firms fail to take heed of the growing interest of employees to work on a policy that solves any discrepancy with regards to connectivity for personal use.

As a matter of fact, 84% of respondents said they would be willing to sign an Internet usage policy with their employer if it were to translate into better connectivity while onboard.

Installations and running costs against connectivity onboard

Maritime employees also alluded that service installations and running costs are key reasons why companies deny Internet access for personal use onboard, which cannot be otherwise proven considering that every vessel has different bandwidth and/or communication needs.

While there are several packages and integral alternatives available to maritime companies in the market, debunking cost-related justifications requires valid scenario constructions and estimates, which, to some extent, were abstractly covered by the above-mentioned international survey.

Cognisant of VSAT broadband opportunities, iDirect has introduced, discussed, and analysed typical costs per MB based on C-band, Ku-band, and L-band coverage. By designing a business case for every broadband choice, this study developed a price spread for overall costs depending on usage profiles.

This construct has helped the group to amortise installation costs over fixed periods and put them together with monthly usage charges to conclude that C-band and Ku-band choices are more cost-effective than L-band coverage over the long-term.

From a financial perspective, iDirect argues that making an investment on VSAT technologies over the short-run could be painful, but the return on investment (ROI) over the long term outranks any pay-per-use model today. Yet, when it comes to satellite communications, integration and service adjustments are vital during a loss of service.

To avoid service disruptions, L-band coverage works impressively as a VSAT-backup alternative, which delivers resiliency at its best. For example, Iridium – a global satellite communications provider – is launching Iridium NEXT to create a new constellation of satellites with an upgraded L-band coverage, which is scheduled to be completed by mid-2018.

Distraction against connectivity onboard

Lastly, another critical obstacle to the provision of Internet access for personal use is distraction from work, which also adheres to the sailor’s perception of connectivity onboard, covered by marineinsights.com.

Motivated by the plausibility of connecting seafarers with their loved ones, this article outlined key disadvantages against Internet onboard ships based on behavioural justifications, risks on duty, and unapproved actions.

“Behavioural justifications” refers to reduced socialisation, inappropriate usage times, and social media addiction, whereas “unapproved actions” comprises conflicts and misunderstandings in usage, adult or questionable content, brand-damaging or immoral content, offensive or discrediting posts, and Internet piracy.

Notwithstanding the fact that both behavioural justifications and unapproved actions are side-effects of the investment in connectivity in deep waters, which commonly take place during recess time, “risks on duty” further details the effect that connectivity has upon performance.

Engaged seafarers explained that “risks on duty”, which includes watchkeeping interference, troubleshooting, and other work-related distractions increases the margin of error that certain tasks cannot simply afford.

Again, as it was anteriorly mentioned above, 84% of seafarers are willing to sign an Internet usage policy with their employer if that initiative translates into a better connectivity while onboard. However, when it comes to social interactions, this same survey shows that not speaking the common language makes a stronger impact upon social interaction onboard than crew connectivity.

Fulfilling operational and crew expectations by connecting vessels

Owners and operators cannot afford to underestimate the power of connectivity ever again. Note that maritime companies are facing continuous demands on data-driven applications for strategic decision-making and other operational/safety efficiencies that are pivotal to success.

Similarly, there is a growing emphasis in career progression and training methods that could only be powered by changes in service infrastructure. A new generation of seafarers are breaking the status-quo in the maritime industry, expecting uninterrupted connectivity for professional and personal use regardless of location.

Limiting connectivity today results in competitive disadvantage and stagnation not only for owners and operators but also for the entire industry. For that reason, the maritime industry needs to be reactive to crew demands, take a long-term approach towards crew retention, and start connecting vessels in the most reliable, cost-effective way.

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[fusion_builder_container hundred_percent="no" equal_height_columns="no" menu_anchor="" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" class="" id="" background_color="" background_image="" background_position="center center" background_repeat="no-repeat" fade="no" background_parallax="none" parallax_speed="0.3" video_mp4="" video_webm="" video_ogv="" video_url="" video_aspect_ratio="16:9" video_loop="yes" video_mute="yes" overlay_color="" video_preview_image="" border_size="" border_color="" border_style="solid" padding_top="" padding_bottom="" padding_left="" padding_right=""][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type="1_1" layout="1_1" background_position="left top" background_color="" border_size="" border_color="" border_style="solid" border_position="all" spacing="yes" background_image="" background_repeat="no-repeat" padding_top="" padding_right="" padding_bottom="" padding_left="" margin_top="0px" margin_bottom="0px" class="" id="" animation_type="" animation_speed="0.3" animation_direction="left" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" center_content="no" last="no" min_height="" hover_type="none" link=""][fusion_imageframe image_id="4870|full" max_width="" style_type="" blur="" stylecolor="" hover_type="none" bordersize="" bordercolor="" borderradius="" align="center" lightbox="no" gallery_id="" lightbox_image="" lightbox_image_id="" alt="" link="" linktarget="_self" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" class="" id="" animation_type="" animation_direction="left" animation_speed="0.3" animation_offset=""]http://217.199.187.200/valourconsultancy.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/Ship.jpg[/fusion_imageframe][fusion_separator style_type="default" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" class="" id="" sep_color="#ffffff" top_margin="20" bottom_margin="20" border_size="" icon="" icon_circle="" icon_circle_color="" width="" alignment="center" /][fusion_text]When Nautilus International – a global trade union and professional association for seafarers and other crew in the maritime industry – carried out their 2017 investigation into connectivity at sea, major attention was given to the quality of connectivity that crew have onboard. In an era where connectivity is no longer an expectation but a norm, this survey found that 88% of crew were able to connect to the Internet regularly, which is an improvement for an industry that tends to embrace technology relatively slowly. Communication anomalies against connectivity onboard Not only had connectivity made an impact on crew’s attitude towards long-term employment opportunities and social issues, it also redefined human resources retaining policies in accordance with the Maritime Labor Convention adopted in 2006. Yet, this survey reported some communication anomalies that maritime employers need to address if they are to improve the lives of those who work in remote locations. Whilst 83% of companies commented that they were concerned that crew may download illegal or adult content, only 16% of crew reported unauthorised content as a main reason for not providing Internet access for personal use. At a first glance, maritime employers appear to be reluctant to the provision of onboard connectivity for cyber-security reasons, but firms fail to take heed of the growing interest of employees to work on a policy that solves any discrepancy with regards to connectivity for personal use. As a matter of fact, 84% of respondents said they would be willing to sign an Internet usage policy with their employer if it were to translate into better connectivity while onboard. Installations and running costs against connectivity onboard Maritime employees also alluded that service installations and running costs are key reasons why companies deny Internet access for personal use onboard, which cannot be otherwise proven considering that every vessel has different bandwidth and/or communication needs. While there are several packages and integral alternatives available to maritime companies in the market, debunking cost-related justifications requires valid scenario constructions and estimates, which, to some extent, were abstractly covered by the above-mentioned international survey. Cognisant of VSAT broadband opportunities, iDirect has introduced, discussed, and analysed typical costs per MB based on C-band, Ku-band, and L-band coverage. By designing a business case for every broadband choice, this study developed a price spread for overall costs depending on usage profiles. This construct has helped the group to amortise installation costs over fixed periods and put them together with monthly usage charges to conclude that C-band and Ku-band choices are more cost-effective than L-band coverage over the long-term. From a financial perspective, iDirect argues that making an investment on VSAT technologies over the short-run could be painful, but the return on investment (ROI) over the long term outranks any pay-per-use model today. Yet, when it comes to satellite communications, integration and service adjustments are vital during a loss of service. To avoid service disruptions, L-band coverage works impressively as a VSAT-backup alternative, which delivers resiliency at its best. For example, Iridium – a global satellite communications provider – is launching Iridium NEXT to create a new constellation of satellites with an upgraded L-band coverage, which is scheduled to be completed by mid-2018. Distraction against connectivity onboard Lastly, another critical obstacle to the provision of Internet access for personal use is distraction from work, which also adheres to the sailor’s perception of connectivity onboard, covered by marineinsights.com. Motivated by the plausibility of connecting seafarers with their loved ones, this article outlined key disadvantages against Internet onboard ships based on behavioural justifications, risks on duty, and unapproved actions. “Behavioural justifications” refers to reduced socialisation, inappropriate usage times, and social media addiction, whereas “unapproved actions” comprises conflicts and misunderstandings in usage, adult or questionable content, brand-damaging or immoral content, offensive or discrediting posts, and Internet piracy. Notwithstanding the fact that both behavioural justifications and unapproved actions are side-effects of the investment in connectivity in deep waters, which commonly take place during recess time, “risks on duty” further details the effect that connectivity has upon performance. Engaged seafarers explained that “risks on duty”, which includes watchkeeping interference, troubleshooting, and other work-related distractions increases the margin of error that certain tasks cannot simply afford. Again, as it was anteriorly mentioned above, 84% of seafarers are willing to sign an Internet usage policy with their employer if that initiative translates into a better connectivity while onboard. However, when it comes to social interactions, this same survey shows that not speaking the common language makes a stronger impact upon social interaction onboard than crew connectivity. Fulfilling operational and crew expectations by connecting vessels Owners and operators cannot afford to underestimate the power of connectivity ever again. Note that maritime companies are facing continuous demands on data-driven applications for strategic decision-making and other operational/safety efficiencies that are pivotal to success. Similarly, there is a growing emphasis in career progression and training methods that could only be powered by changes in service infrastructure. A new generation of seafarers are breaking the status-quo in the maritime industry, expecting uninterrupted connectivity for professional and personal use regardless of location. Limiting connectivity today results in competitive disadvantage and stagnation not only for owners and operators but also for the entire industry. For that reason, the maritime industry needs to be reactive to crew demands, take a long-term approach towards crew retention, and start connecting vessels in the most reliable, cost-effective way.[/fusion_text][/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]

Hyundai Heavy Industries pioneers Smart Ship Solutions

In early July 2017, South Korean shipbuilder Hyundai Heavy Industries (HHI) announced the debut of their proprietary Information and Communications Technology (ICT) system to accelerate internal communications and navigation efficiencies. Its goal is to capitalise on economic opportunities, sophisticated access to modern navigation technologies, and vessel management and engineering. Far from a commitment to efficiency and safety, connecting vessels ashore appears to be a new milestone in the firm’s pursuit of an Integrated Smart Ship Solution (ISSS) and effective management of stakeholders.

To extend continuity and customer care across the value chain, smart ship solutions go deeper into the management of big data improvements to guarantee uninterrupted, coordinated navigation with increasing availability of fully-functional features onboard, and tested engineering-oriented tools and backups. Through performance, the corporation outlined how ISSS provides a wide range of ship information to operators, including optimal navigation routes and navigation speed along with a slope status of the front and back hull to minimise the resistance a ship encounters on voyage.

Proactive monitoring, along with action plans are also key improvements when it comes to stakeholder demands and engineering methods. It is a clear response to the different voices found within the industry, from port operators who insist on programmed cooperation and productivity at port, to meticulous management of transparency and vessel history from insurers. From an engineering perspective, ISSS allows for safer and more efficient management of vessels by working on energy data and keeping track of powered engines and other equipment for optimised navigation.

According to HHI, the solution, after completing regular field testing and applied in a 6,500 pure car/truck carriers (PCTC) and a 250,000 deadweight tonnage of very large ore carriers (DWT VLOC), is expected to reduce annual operating costs by 6 percent, which, ultimately, would increase profit margins and expertise. At the same time, ISSS addresses other challenges already found in both the maritime industry and business infrastructure, namely; over-capacity, inefficient costs of navigation, sustainable and safety needs, as well as IoT/digital/satellite technologies that tackle dated business models, and excruciating, traditional ways of ship-to-shore communications.

It is predicted that demand for smart ships will have a positive impact on the maritime industry as operational and safety needs are pushing the agenda all the way to the top for highly competitive shipbuilders. Coupled with research and predictions, the International Maritime Organization (IMO) will also introduce e-Navigation as a component that provides excellent organisation of data for commercial ships by 2019, which assists the progress of meaningful stakeholder relationships and pushes the demand for smart ships even further.

Beyond the potentiality that smart ships have on performance, there is continuous work and evolution that has led HHI to a competitive level of expertise. In 2011, the shipbuilder launched a cutting-edge version of its smart ship solutions – “a first of its kind” system – and has since implemented the technology on approximately 300 delivered ships as of 2017. Combining unparalleled expertise and internal capabilities, HHI acquired solid experience by partnering with Accenture – a global management consulting, technology services, and outsourcing company – to create an innovative system designed to reach major competitiveness with real-time data.

This collaboration has not only allowed HHI to master the arts of the IoT and built-in technologies, but also to optimise navigation and operational savings while moving successfully from the manufacturing field to services. “ HHI’s technology seeks to align with delivering the key benefits we believe the maritime industry will most benefit from through the adoption of connected, digital and autonomous technologies as the next generation of shipping embraces digitalisation,” said Luis Benito, director of Marine and Offshore Innovation, Strategy, and Research for Lloyd’s Register.

Another important milestone took place earlier in May this year, when HHI and Bhari – the National Shipping Company of Saudi Arabia – signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to strengthen long-lasting relationships and commit to current and future projects. Both parties have agreed that working together is crucial to the design of data-driven initiatives that give the green light to a better decision-making process, generate higher revenues, and achieve customer satisfaction in the transportation industry.

As time goes by HHI has taken a lead in the development of smart shipping solutions for safer navigation and efficient ship routing. HHI has also designed a vessel data model as a foundation platform that will secure the transfer of whole data from sea to shore, delivering multiple, reliable services to ship owners. Perhaps some of these technologies will be supplemented and operated by Middle East owners to enhance its collaborations, or it may be the case that HHI would contemplate a successful move from initial on-ship services to a promising, stakeholder-oriented scenario.

Recently, although HHI has suffered a substantial loss of approximately 12 percent of ship sales in 2015, the company is still ranked first with over USD 24.4 billion worth of vessels on order as of 2016. However, important technology developments along with green and other stakeholder demands are once again re-defining the industry. “According to Clarkson Research, about 6,500 ships are to be ordered globally for the next five years. Considering the global shipbuilding market share attributed to HHI, ISSS is to be installed on approximately 700 ships for the comparable time period,” continued Benito.

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[fusion_builder_container hundred_percent="no" equal_height_columns="no" menu_anchor="" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" class="" id="" background_color="" background_image="" background_position="center center" background_repeat="no-repeat" fade="no" background_parallax="none" parallax_speed="0.3" video_mp4="" video_webm="" video_ogv="" video_url="" video_aspect_ratio="16:9" video_loop="yes" video_mute="yes" overlay_color="" video_preview_image="" border_size="" border_color="" border_style="solid" padding_top="" padding_bottom="" padding_left="" padding_right=""][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type="1_1" layout="1_1" background_position="left top" background_color="" border_size="" border_color="" border_style="solid" border_position="all" spacing="yes" background_image="" background_repeat="no-repeat" padding_top="" padding_right="" padding_bottom="" padding_left="" margin_top="0px" margin_bottom="0px" class="" id="" animation_type="" animation_speed="0.3" animation_direction="left" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" center_content="no" last="no" min_height="" hover_type="none" link=""][fusion_imageframe image_id="4959|full" max_width="" style_type="" blur="" stylecolor="" hover_type="none" bordersize="" bordercolor="" borderradius="" align="center" lightbox="no" gallery_id="" lightbox_image="" lightbox_image_id="" alt="" link="" linktarget="_self" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" class="" id="" animation_type="" animation_direction="left" animation_speed="0.3" animation_offset=""]http://217.199.187.200/valourconsultancy.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Fotosearch_k27019534-1024x683-1.jpg[/fusion_imageframe][fusion_separator style_type="default" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" class="" id="" sep_color="#ffffff" top_margin="20" bottom_margin="20" border_size="" icon="" icon_circle="" icon_circle_color="" width="" alignment="center" /][fusion_text] In early July 2017, South Korean shipbuilder Hyundai Heavy Industries (HHI) announced the debut of their proprietary Information and Communications Technology (ICT) system to accelerate internal communications and navigation efficiencies. Its goal is to capitalise on economic opportunities, sophisticated access to modern navigation technologies, and vessel management and engineering. Far from a commitment to efficiency and safety, connecting vessels ashore appears to be a new milestone in the firm’s pursuit of an Integrated Smart Ship Solution (ISSS) and effective management of stakeholders. To extend continuity and customer care across the value chain, smart ship solutions go deeper into the management of big data improvements to guarantee uninterrupted, coordinated navigation with increasing availability of fully-functional features onboard, and tested engineering-oriented tools and backups. Through performance, the corporation outlined how ISSS provides a wide range of ship information to operators, including optimal navigation routes and navigation speed along with a slope status of the front and back hull to minimise the resistance a ship encounters on voyage. Proactive monitoring, along with action plans are also key improvements when it comes to stakeholder demands and engineering methods. It is a clear response to the different voices found within the industry, from port operators who insist on programmed cooperation and productivity at port, to meticulous management of transparency and vessel history from insurers. From an engineering perspective, ISSS allows for safer and more efficient management of vessels by working on energy data and keeping track of powered engines and other equipment for optimised navigation. According to HHI, the solution, after completing regular field testing and applied in a 6,500 pure car/truck carriers (PCTC) and a 250,000 deadweight tonnage of very large ore carriers (DWT VLOC), is expected to reduce annual operating costs by 6 percent, which, ultimately, would increase profit margins and expertise. At the same time, ISSS addresses other challenges already found in both the maritime industry and business infrastructure, namely; over-capacity, inefficient costs of navigation, sustainable and safety needs, as well as IoT/digital/satellite technologies that tackle dated business models, and excruciating, traditional ways of ship-to-shore communications. It is predicted that demand for smart ships will have a positive impact on the maritime industry as operational and safety needs are pushing the agenda all the way to the top for highly competitive shipbuilders. Coupled with research and predictions, the International Maritime Organization (IMO) will also introduce e-Navigation as a component that provides excellent organisation of data for commercial ships by 2019, which assists the progress of meaningful stakeholder relationships and pushes the demand for smart ships even further. Beyond the potentiality that smart ships have on performance, there is continuous work and evolution that has led HHI to a competitive level of expertise. In 2011, the shipbuilder launched a cutting-edge version of its smart ship solutions – “a first of its kind” system – and has since implemented the technology on approximately 300 delivered ships as of 2017. Combining unparalleled expertise and internal capabilities, HHI acquired solid experience by partnering with Accenture – a global management consulting, technology services, and outsourcing company – to create an innovative system designed to reach major competitiveness with real-time data. This collaboration has not only allowed HHI to master the arts of the IoT and built-in technologies, but also to optimise navigation and operational savings while moving successfully from the manufacturing field to services. “ HHI’s technology seeks to align with delivering the key benefits we believe the maritime industry will most benefit from through the adoption of connected, digital and autonomous technologies as the next generation of shipping embraces digitalisation,” said Luis Benito, director of Marine and Offshore Innovation, Strategy, and Research for Lloyd’s Register. Another important milestone took place earlier in May this year, when HHI and Bhari – the National Shipping Company of Saudi Arabia – signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to strengthen long-lasting relationships and commit to current and future projects. Both parties have agreed that working together is crucial to the design of data-driven initiatives that give the green light to a better decision-making process, generate higher revenues, and achieve customer satisfaction in the transportation industry. As time goes by HHI has taken a lead in the development of smart shipping solutions for safer navigation and efficient ship routing. HHI has also designed a vessel data model as a foundation platform that will secure the transfer of whole data from sea to shore, delivering multiple, reliable services to ship owners. Perhaps some of these technologies will be supplemented and operated by Middle East owners to enhance its collaborations, or it may be the case that HHI would contemplate a successful move from initial on-ship services to a promising, stakeholder-oriented scenario. Recently, although HHI has suffered a substantial loss of approximately 12 percent of ship sales in 2015, the company is still ranked first with over USD 24.4 billion worth of vessels on order as of 2016. However, important technology developments along with green and other stakeholder demands are once again re-defining the industry. “According to Clarkson Research, about 6,500 ships are to be ordered globally for the next five years. Considering the global shipbuilding market share attributed to HHI, ISSS is to be installed on approximately 700 ships for the comparable time period,” continued Benito. [/fusion_text][/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]

Smart Airports: New Technologies Set to Take Flight & Transform the Passenger Journey

The following blog was written by John Devlin, founder of P.A.ID Strategies, one of Valour Consultancy’s trusted partners. The original article can be viewed here.

Future Growth is Outstripping Capacity

With forecasts for growth in air travel ranging from 60% to 100% over the next 20 years, airport operators, airlines and governments face a number of significant challenges.  The predominant question is how to cope with the far greater passenger numbers (and airfreight) without doubling the number of airports.  There will certainly continue to be new airports built, new runways added to existing airports, plus renovation of terminals to ensure that service standards are maintained but it is not cost effective or practical for a combination of reasons to think that future demand can be met by simply building more airports.

Efficiency Over Capacity

So how will this be addressed?  Capacity will be increased but not, as said, by doubling the number of airports.  Generally, airports are in the right places to meet demand and creating multiple versions of the same infrastructure and human resources is inefficient and creates a drain on the available knowledge and skills-base.  Whilst most airports are relatively efficient, they have largely been following the formulae and procedures put in place in the 1950s, 60s and 70s.  Yes, operationally as traffic has increased airports have refined their procedures but essentially, they have not evolved to any great degree.  Better asset utilisation and understanding of and interaction with passengers are key objectives for many airports operators.

Traditional Models are being Disrupted

There certainly remains a need for strong regulation and security but as businesses and consumers have embraced innovative technologies, especially around mobile and the personalisation of services, the passenger experience has not yet progressed to any great degree.  Many businesses and industries have been transformed over the past 5-10 years.  Connectivity, the Internet and smartphones have been the catalyst for much of this.  However, advances in infrastructure, especially at end-points and with the IoT, generate better data, enable more personalisation of services and allow more context to be added to the user experience.

Traditional industries no longer have a lock-down on how their service and/or product is provided, bought or consumed.  The Internet has had a major effect on the travel sector, changing how we buy flights, hotels and even airport parking but it all stops at the airport door.  We don’t expect to see disruption on the scale of Uber affect the airlines – at least not in the next 10-15 years – but we do believe that the competitive drivers within the sector will see more movement than we have to date.

Airports and Aviation are Ready for Digital Transformation

We are approaching an inflection point for the sector.  Competition between airlines is not going away and with advances in other areas of (personal) transportation and mass transit this will continue to intensify.  Airport operators are competing more than ever to attract passenger traffic and ensure that they can offer the most attractive financial and service proposition to the airlines.  Balanced against this they have to be careful to ensure that they maintain or improve their customer satisfaction levels.

Costs and pricing can only affect so much of the decision.  The passenger experience is now a differentiating factor and as prices have been driven down there is an increasing focus on generating ancillary revenues – both in-flight and on the ground for both airlines and airport operators.  We have had mobile apps from airlines for a few years but they are very focused on loyalty and do not go much beyond checking-in and boarding passes in terms of tailoring to individuals.  There is little tie in with retail and hospitality, or travelling to and from the airport and parking, car-hire, refreshments, in-flight entertainment and personalised updates.  There most certainly is no ability to connect with the airport and ease the biggest pain points of queueing through security and at the boarding gate.

Future Technologies for Smart Airports – Creating the Digital Passenger Experience

Mobile, apps, online, digital and mobile identity, know your customer (KYC) and authenticating identity, biometrics (facial, fingerprint, iris), sensors, beacons, new forms of payment, mobile wallets, NFC and contactless, RFID, Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, intelligent video analytics, big data, new human interface technologies, chatbots, robots and intelligent assistants.  These are all existing technologies and progressing rapidly, often happening behind the scenes but affecting how we use services and the decisions that we make.

These technologies can be employed within a future smart airport environment, reducing queues, improving the passenger experience, helping operators, airlines and their partners better engage with their customers, understand them and meet their requirements.  In turn, this has the upside of better customer service and improved loyalty as well as greater revenue potential, whilst also creating more efficient airports that are better able to meet future demand and capacity requirements.

Note: Three analyst firms are working together to provide a detailed analysis of Future Technologies for Smart Airports.  Their combined expertise, insight and knowledge will provide the most comprehensive assessments for smart airports.  P.A.ID Strategies provides nearly 20 years of experience around mobile, identity, payments, biometrics, NFC, RFID and security.  SAR Insight has 20 years of knowledge in the semiconductor sector with expertise in Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, sensors, smart devices and the IoT.  Valour Consultancy has over 30 years’ analyst experience and is the leading provider of market intelligence for in-flight connectivity, in-flight entertainment, cabin technology, connected aircraft and the IoT.

They are working to develop a new market report entitled “Future Technologies for Smart Airports – creating the digital passenger experience” examining the potential adoption of modern technologies to make airports smarter, more efficient and deliver better service to customers and partners.  Please contact John Devlin at info@paidstrategies.com for more information.

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[fusion_builder_container hundred_percent="no" equal_height_columns="no" menu_anchor="" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" class="" id="" background_color="" background_image="" background_position="center center" background_repeat="no-repeat" fade="no" background_parallax="none" parallax_speed="0.3" video_mp4="" video_webm="" video_ogv="" video_url="" video_aspect_ratio="16:9" video_loop="yes" video_mute="yes" overlay_color="" video_preview_image="" border_size="" border_color="" border_style="solid" padding_top="" padding_bottom="" padding_left="" padding_right=""][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type="1_1" layout="1_1" background_position="left top" background_color="" border_size="" border_color="" border_style="solid" border_position="all" spacing="yes" background_image="" background_repeat="no-repeat" padding_top="" padding_right="" padding_bottom="" padding_left="" margin_top="0px" margin_bottom="0px" class="" id="" animation_type="" animation_speed="0.3" animation_direction="left" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" center_content="no" last="no" min_height="" hover_type="none" link=""][fusion_imageframe image_id="4968|full" max_width="" style_type="" blur="" stylecolor="" hover_type="none" bordersize="" bordercolor="" borderradius="" align="center" lightbox="no" gallery_id="" lightbox_image="" lightbox_image_id="" alt="" link="" linktarget="_self" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" class="" id="" animation_type="" animation_direction="left" animation_speed="0.3" animation_offset=""]http://217.199.187.200/valourconsultancy.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/smart-airports-1024x576-1.jpg[/fusion_imageframe][fusion_separator style_type="default" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" class="" id="" sep_color="#ffffff" top_margin="20" bottom_margin="20" border_size="" icon="" icon_circle="" icon_circle_color="" width="" alignment="center" /][fusion_text] The following blog was written by John Devlin, founder of P.A.ID Strategies, one of Valour Consultancy's trusted partners. The original article can be viewed here. Future Growth is Outstripping Capacity With forecasts for growth in air travel ranging from 60% to 100% over the next 20 years, airport operators, airlines and governments face a number of significant challenges.  The predominant question is how to cope with the far greater passenger numbers (and airfreight) without doubling the number of airports.  There will certainly continue to be new airports built, new runways added to existing airports, plus renovation of terminals to ensure that service standards are maintained but it is not cost effective or practical for a combination of reasons to think that future demand can be met by simply building more airports. Efficiency Over Capacity So how will this be addressed?  Capacity will be increased but not, as said, by doubling the number of airports.  Generally, airports are in the right places to meet demand and creating multiple versions of the same infrastructure and human resources is inefficient and creates a drain on the available knowledge and skills-base.  Whilst most airports are relatively efficient, they have largely been following the formulae and procedures put in place in the 1950s, 60s and 70s.  Yes, operationally as traffic has increased airports have refined their procedures but essentially, they have not evolved to any great degree.  Better asset utilisation and understanding of and interaction with passengers are key objectives for many airports operators. Traditional Models are being Disrupted There certainly remains a need for strong regulation and security but as businesses and consumers have embraced innovative technologies, especially around mobile and the personalisation of services, the passenger experience has not yet progressed to any great degree.  Many businesses and industries have been transformed over the past 5-10 years.  Connectivity, the Internet and smartphones have been the catalyst for much of this.  However, advances in infrastructure, especially at end-points and with the IoT, generate better data, enable more personalisation of services and allow more context to be added to the user experience. Traditional industries no longer have a lock-down on how their service and/or product is provided, bought or consumed.  The Internet has had a major effect on the travel sector, changing how we buy flights, hotels and even airport parking but it all stops at the airport door.  We don’t expect to see disruption on the scale of Uber affect the airlines – at least not in the next 10-15 years – but we do believe that the competitive drivers within the sector will see more movement than we have to date. Airports and Aviation are Ready for Digital Transformation We are approaching an inflection point for the sector.  Competition between airlines is not going away and with advances in other areas of (personal) transportation and mass transit this will continue to intensify.  Airport operators are competing more than ever to attract passenger traffic and ensure that they can offer the most attractive financial and service proposition to the airlines.  Balanced against this they have to be careful to ensure that they maintain or improve their customer satisfaction levels. Costs and pricing can only affect so much of the decision.  The passenger experience is now a differentiating factor and as prices have been driven down there is an increasing focus on generating ancillary revenues – both in-flight and on the ground for both airlines and airport operators.  We have had mobile apps from airlines for a few years but they are very focused on loyalty and do not go much beyond checking-in and boarding passes in terms of tailoring to individuals.  There is little tie in with retail and hospitality, or travelling to and from the airport and parking, car-hire, refreshments, in-flight entertainment and personalised updates.  There most certainly is no ability to connect with the airport and ease the biggest pain points of queueing through security and at the boarding gate. Future Technologies for Smart Airports – Creating the Digital Passenger Experience Mobile, apps, online, digital and mobile identity, know your customer (KYC) and authenticating identity, biometrics (facial, fingerprint, iris), sensors, beacons, new forms of payment, mobile wallets, NFC and contactless, RFID, Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, intelligent video analytics, big data, new human interface technologies, chatbots, robots and intelligent assistants.  These are all existing technologies and progressing rapidly, often happening behind the scenes but affecting how we use services and the decisions that we make. These technologies can be employed within a future smart airport environment, reducing queues, improving the passenger experience, helping operators, airlines and their partners better engage with their customers, understand them and meet their requirements.  In turn, this has the upside of better customer service and improved loyalty as well as greater revenue potential, whilst also creating more efficient airports that are better able to meet future demand and capacity requirements. Note: Three analyst firms are working together to provide a detailed analysis of Future Technologies for Smart Airports.  Their combined expertise, insight and knowledge will provide the most comprehensive assessments for smart airports.  P.A.ID Strategies provides nearly 20 years of experience around mobile, identity, payments, biometrics, NFC, RFID and security.  SAR Insight has 20 years of knowledge in the semiconductor sector with expertise in Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, sensors, smart devices and the IoT.  Valour Consultancy has over 30 years’ analyst experience and is the leading provider of market intelligence for in-flight connectivity, in-flight entertainment, cabin technology, connected aircraft and the IoT. They are working to develop a new market report entitled “Future Technologies for Smart Airports – creating the digital passenger experience” examining the potential adoption of modern technologies to make airports smarter, more efficient and deliver better service to customers and partners.  Please contact John Devlin at info@paidstrategies.com for more information. [/fusion_text][/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]

The Market for In-Flight Connectivity on VIP and Business Aircraft

Last month, Valour Consultancy released its latest analysis of the market for in-flight connectivity on VIP and business aircraft. The study draws upon our considerable expertise in analysing the adoption of in-flight connectivity (IFC) in commercial aviation and is the result of a rigorous primary research phase consisting of numerous interviews with key players from across the industry.

The report finds that, globally, there were 19,131 IFC systems on VIP and business aircraft at the end of 2016. L-band was by far and away the most dominant connectivity technology with cumulative connections representing 75% of the total. A large proportion of this is accounted for by Iridium, whose systems support in-flight satellite phone operations on almost 10,000 aircraft. The remainder of L-band connections are accounted for by Inmarsat, which has seen adoption of SwiftBroadband (SBB) pick up rapidly in recent years.

Uptake of Gogo’s Air-to-Ground (ATG) options has been similarly brisk in recent years. By the end 2013, there were 2,047 terminals connected to the Gogo Biz network. This had increased to 4,172 three years later.

ATG and L-band both have room for further growth in coming years, too.

With respect to ATG, there will likely be continued interest in Gogo’s solutions over the course of the forecast period (2016 to 2026), especially now that the company is close to commercial launch of Gogo Biz 4G and plans to have its next-generation ATG network, which will offer peak network speeds of more than 100 Mbps, up and running by 2018.

When you add SmartSky Networks and its 4G network into the mix, as well as the Inmarsat European Aviation Network (EAN), it is apparent that there remains plenty of potential for ATG technology. Though it is yet to be officially confirmed whether the EAN will be used by the business aviation industry, there appears to be consensus that it would work very well on board private aircraft.

While Inmarsat is reportedly seeing a lot of interest from operators looking to upgrade from lower-bandwidth IFC systems to Jet ConneX, the company is also working on increasing the performance of the L-band technology used for SBB. Iridium, meanwhile, is currently prepping for the launch of the second batch of Iridium NEXT satellites, which are due for lift off on the 25th June. Upon completion of the constellation in 2018 and the start of commercial service one year later, the so-called Iridium Certus solution will likely find favour among operators of those small- and medium-sized business jets less suited to the fitment of bulky radomes.

Adoption of Ku-band technology on VIP and business aircraft appears to have an equally rosy future – a view presumably shared by new market entrants, Panasonic Avionics and Global Eagle, as well as Gogo, which recently announced its first business aviation customer for 2Ku. Right now, there are some 500 Ku-band systems in operation on VIP and business aircraft and the vast majority of these are accounted for by ViaSat and its Yonder system (although it’s no longer referred to as Yonder, to shift the focus towards the ViaSat brand). Panasonic and Global Eagle representatives have not been shy in admitting that they are gunning for ViaSat in this market.

However, ViaSat appears content to focus on ensuring existing clients migrate to its Ka-band technology – a sensible strategy given the ongoing success of its Exede in the Air product in commercial aviation. Now that ViaSat-2 has finally launched after several setbacks, there will soon be a considerable amount of additional Ka-band capacity for business jets flying between North America and Europe. Additionally, the company says that it will have its three planned ViaSat-3 satellites operational around 2020 making ViaSat the only rival provider of global Ka-band capacity to Inmarsat.

By 2020, ViaSat could have some catching up to do if the take up of Jet ConneX is anything to go by. Having debuted in November 2016, there were an estimated 30 aircraft fitted with the solution by the turn of the year. Inmarsat has previously stated that it expects to see 150 Jet ConneX-equipped aircraft by the end of 2017 and has a goal of connecting 3,000 jets by 2020 (although it is apparently now upgrading its forecasts).

Overall, we are forecasting that by the end of 2026, there will be 37,710 IFC systems installed on VIP and business aircraft – almost double the current total. The reader should, of course, note that these numbers do not refer to the number of aircraft with IFC. In fact, it is estimated that today, around 1,000 to 2,000 aircraft with Iridium satellite phones also make use of Inmarsat’s SBB network. Likewise, Gogo has publicly reported 4,172 connections to its Gogo Biz service and acts as the service provider for 5,286 installed Iridium terminals as well as 214 installed SBB terminals (a total of 9,972 connections – all accurate and up to date at the end of 2016). However, the firm delivers services to 7,400 aircraft implying many are flying with more than one system installed.

The following factors have driven interest in IFC on VIP and business aircraft and will continue to do so in future:

  • Owners of business aircraft fitted with connectivity equipment some time ago will be keener to take advantage of more recent advances in satellite and hardware technology.
  • The ‘Uber-isation’ of the private aviation industry is increasingly being talked about and with e-commerce replacing traditional methods of sourcing and booking a business jet, easy comparisons between different operators and aircraft means that customers can see where one aircraft has IFC and another doesn’t. This transparency will further encourage operators to improve their offerings.
  • As well as the increased comparison between business jets and their features because of new e-commerce initiatives, business aviation is having to compete with the rapid adoption of IFC in commercial air transport perhaps making a first class connected seat more attractive than a private jet with no in-flight Wi-Fi.
  • Competition is hotting up with the likes of Global Eagle, Panasonic Avionics, BizJetMobile and SmartSky Networks all new to the market or preparing to enter.
  • The launch of several new high throughput satellites (HTS) and the prospect of cheaper capacity and faster services is having an extremely positive effect on the market with service providers having inked several new deals in recent years.
  • The connected aircraft and e-Enablement is beginning to resonate more and more as a way to drive operational efficiencies and help underpin the IFC business case.

Some of the remaining challenges to more widespread adoption of IFC on VIP and business aircraft are as follows.

  • Production of new business jets has stagnated and consequently reduced the possibility of line-fit offerability deals for many IFC providers and limited their opportunities for growth.
  • Fitting an aircraft with a sizeable antenna to enable IFC impacts aerodynamics and increases fuel burn, thereby driving up operating costs. Additionally, many smaller business jets are currently unable to accommodate larger Ku- and Ka-band antennas on their fuselages.
  • Current generation Ku-/Ka-band systems lock operators into the service provider (so the hardware is not provider agnostic) and should there be a desire to switch, a very expensive refit ensues.
  • While commercial airlines tend to fly set routes at specific times of day, business jets are more sporadic. One day they may be flying domestically in the US, the next they may be making their way to China or Russia. This uncertainty means high-bandwidth IFC solutions that offer global coverage – which are currently few in number – are perhaps more compelling.
  • Many in the industry are concerned that as we move towards realising the vision of the fully-connected aircraft, the opportunity for cyberattacks will increase. The main worry seems to be that such systems will allow wrongdoers to control aircraft and manipulate commands issued to the aircraft. It should be noted that flight control systems are purposefully isolated from all other communications networks on-board the aircraft.
  • Selling an IFC service based on deployment events that have not happened is a significant challenge and operators understandably give much more credit to satellite assets in space than on paper. Further, a delay to the launch of any service has the potential to scare prospective customers away or send them into the arms of rivals. Unfortunately, such delays are all too commonplace for many much-anticipated IFC solutions.

Published in May 2017, “The Market for In-Flight Connectivity on VIP and Business Aircraft” provides an unrivalled insight and analysis into the current and future deployment of IFC on these aircraft. The number of IFC systems installed in 2016 is quantified with forecasts out to 2026 and data is segmented by fitment type, aircraft size, frequency band and geographic region with a full qualitative discussion of the key trends at play in support of this. The report also sizes the market for both service revenues and key enabling hardware, in addition to market share estimates for service providers and capacity providers. A chapter profiling key players is presented, too.

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[fusion_builder_container hundred_percent="no" equal_height_columns="no" menu_anchor="" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" class="" id="" background_color="" background_image="" background_position="center center" background_repeat="no-repeat" fade="no" background_parallax="none" parallax_speed="0.3" video_mp4="" video_webm="" video_ogv="" video_url="" video_aspect_ratio="16:9" video_loop="yes" video_mute="yes" overlay_color="" video_preview_image="" border_size="" border_color="" border_style="solid" padding_top="" padding_bottom="" padding_left="" padding_right=""][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type="1_1" layout="1_1" background_position="left top" background_color="" border_size="" border_color="" border_style="solid" border_position="all" spacing="yes" background_image="" background_repeat="no-repeat" padding_top="" padding_right="" padding_bottom="" padding_left="" margin_top="0px" margin_bottom="0px" class="" id="" animation_type="" animation_speed="0.3" animation_direction="left" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" center_content="no" last="no" min_height="" hover_type="none" link=""][fusion_imageframe image_id="4980|full" max_width="" style_type="" blur="" stylecolor="" hover_type="none" bordersize="" bordercolor="" borderradius="" align="center" lightbox="no" gallery_id="" lightbox_image="" lightbox_image_id="" alt="" link="" linktarget="_self" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" class="" id="" animation_type="" animation_direction="left" animation_speed="0.3" animation_offset=""]http://217.199.187.200/valourconsultancy.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/luxury-1961577_960_720-1.jpg[/fusion_imageframe][fusion_separator style_type="default" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" class="" id="" sep_color="#ffffff" top_margin="20" bottom_margin="20" border_size="" icon="" icon_circle="" icon_circle_color="" width="" alignment="center" /][fusion_text] Last month, Valour Consultancy released its latest analysis of the market for in-flight connectivity on VIP and business aircraft. The study draws upon our considerable expertise in analysing the adoption of in-flight connectivity (IFC) in commercial aviation and is the result of a rigorous primary research phase consisting of numerous interviews with key players from across the industry. The report finds that, globally, there were 19,131 IFC systems on VIP and business aircraft at the end of 2016. L-band was by far and away the most dominant connectivity technology with cumulative connections representing 75% of the total. A large proportion of this is accounted for by Iridium, whose systems support in-flight satellite phone operations on almost 10,000 aircraft. The remainder of L-band connections are accounted for by Inmarsat, which has seen adoption of SwiftBroadband (SBB) pick up rapidly in recent years. Uptake of Gogo’s Air-to-Ground (ATG) options has been similarly brisk in recent years. By the end 2013, there were 2,047 terminals connected to the Gogo Biz network. This had increased to 4,172 three years later. ATG and L-band both have room for further growth in coming years, too. With respect to ATG, there will likely be continued interest in Gogo’s solutions over the course of the forecast period (2016 to 2026), especially now that the company is close to commercial launch of Gogo Biz 4G and plans to have its next-generation ATG network, which will offer peak network speeds of more than 100 Mbps, up and running by 2018. When you add SmartSky Networks and its 4G network into the mix, as well as the Inmarsat European Aviation Network (EAN), it is apparent that there remains plenty of potential for ATG technology. Though it is yet to be officially confirmed whether the EAN will be used by the business aviation industry, there appears to be consensus that it would work very well on board private aircraft. While Inmarsat is reportedly seeing a lot of interest from operators looking to upgrade from lower-bandwidth IFC systems to Jet ConneX, the company is also working on increasing the performance of the L-band technology used for SBB. Iridium, meanwhile, is currently prepping for the launch of the second batch of Iridium NEXT satellites, which are due for lift off on the 25th June. Upon completion of the constellation in 2018 and the start of commercial service one year later, the so-called Iridium Certus solution will likely find favour among operators of those small- and medium-sized business jets less suited to the fitment of bulky radomes. Adoption of Ku-band technology on VIP and business aircraft appears to have an equally rosy future – a view presumably shared by new market entrants, Panasonic Avionics and Global Eagle, as well as Gogo, which recently announced its first business aviation customer for 2Ku. Right now, there are some 500 Ku-band systems in operation on VIP and business aircraft and the vast majority of these are accounted for by ViaSat and its Yonder system (although it's no longer referred to as Yonder, to shift the focus towards the ViaSat brand). Panasonic and Global Eagle representatives have not been shy in admitting that they are gunning for ViaSat in this market. However, ViaSat appears content to focus on ensuring existing clients migrate to its Ka-band technology – a sensible strategy given the ongoing success of its Exede in the Air product in commercial aviation. Now that ViaSat-2 has finally launched after several setbacks, there will soon be a considerable amount of additional Ka-band capacity for business jets flying between North America and Europe. Additionally, the company says that it will have its three planned ViaSat-3 satellites operational around 2020 making ViaSat the only rival provider of global Ka-band capacity to Inmarsat. By 2020, ViaSat could have some catching up to do if the take up of Jet ConneX is anything to go by. Having debuted in November 2016, there were an estimated 30 aircraft fitted with the solution by the turn of the year. Inmarsat has previously stated that it expects to see 150 Jet ConneX-equipped aircraft by the end of 2017 and has a goal of connecting 3,000 jets by 2020 (although it is apparently now upgrading its forecasts). Overall, we are forecasting that by the end of 2026, there will be 37,710 IFC systems installed on VIP and business aircraft – almost double the current total. The reader should, of course, note that these numbers do not refer to the number of aircraft with IFC. In fact, it is estimated that today, around 1,000 to 2,000 aircraft with Iridium satellite phones also make use of Inmarsat’s SBB network. Likewise, Gogo has publicly reported 4,172 connections to its Gogo Biz service and acts as the service provider for 5,286 installed Iridium terminals as well as 214 installed SBB terminals (a total of 9,972 connections – all accurate and up to date at the end of 2016). However, the firm delivers services to 7,400 aircraft implying many are flying with more than one system installed. The following factors have driven interest in IFC on VIP and business aircraft and will continue to do so in future:
  • Owners of business aircraft fitted with connectivity equipment some time ago will be keener to take advantage of more recent advances in satellite and hardware technology.
  • The ‘Uber-isation’ of the private aviation industry is increasingly being talked about and with e-commerce replacing traditional methods of sourcing and booking a business jet, easy comparisons between different operators and aircraft means that customers can see where one aircraft has IFC and another doesn’t. This transparency will further encourage operators to improve their offerings.
  • As well as the increased comparison between business jets and their features because of new e-commerce initiatives, business aviation is having to compete with the rapid adoption of IFC in commercial air transport perhaps making a first class connected seat more attractive than a private jet with no in-flight Wi-Fi.
  • Competition is hotting up with the likes of Global Eagle, Panasonic Avionics, BizJetMobile and SmartSky Networks all new to the market or preparing to enter.
  • The launch of several new high throughput satellites (HTS) and the prospect of cheaper capacity and faster services is having an extremely positive effect on the market with service providers having inked several new deals in recent years.
  • The connected aircraft and e-Enablement is beginning to resonate more and more as a way to drive operational efficiencies and help underpin the IFC business case.
Some of the remaining challenges to more widespread adoption of IFC on VIP and business aircraft are as follows.
  • Production of new business jets has stagnated and consequently reduced the possibility of line-fit offerability deals for many IFC providers and limited their opportunities for growth.
  • Fitting an aircraft with a sizeable antenna to enable IFC impacts aerodynamics and increases fuel burn, thereby driving up operating costs. Additionally, many smaller business jets are currently unable to accommodate larger Ku- and Ka-band antennas on their fuselages.
  • Current generation Ku-/Ka-band systems lock operators into the service provider (so the hardware is not provider agnostic) and should there be a desire to switch, a very expensive refit ensues.
  • While commercial airlines tend to fly set routes at specific times of day, business jets are more sporadic. One day they may be flying domestically in the US, the next they may be making their way to China or Russia. This uncertainty means high-bandwidth IFC solutions that offer global coverage – which are currently few in number – are perhaps more compelling.
  • Many in the industry are concerned that as we move towards realising the vision of the fully-connected aircraft, the opportunity for cyberattacks will increase. The main worry seems to be that such systems will allow wrongdoers to control aircraft and manipulate commands issued to the aircraft. It should be noted that flight control systems are purposefully isolated from all other communications networks on-board the aircraft.
  • Selling an IFC service based on deployment events that have not happened is a significant challenge and operators understandably give much more credit to satellite assets in space than on paper. Further, a delay to the launch of any service has the potential to scare prospective customers away or send them into the arms of rivals. Unfortunately, such delays are all too commonplace for many much-anticipated IFC solutions.
Published in May 2017, “The Market for In-Flight Connectivity on VIP and Business Aircraft” provides an unrivalled insight and analysis into the current and future deployment of IFC on these aircraft. The number of IFC systems installed in 2016 is quantified with forecasts out to 2026 and data is segmented by fitment type, aircraft size, frequency band and geographic region with a full qualitative discussion of the key trends at play in support of this. The report also sizes the market for both service revenues and key enabling hardware, in addition to market share estimates for service providers and capacity providers. A chapter profiling key players is presented, too. [/fusion_text][/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]

The Scandinavian dream of maritime communications: A transformational agreement between Ericsson and Maersk

Despite the moderate adoption of new advancements on communication technologies and industrial IoT, the shipping industry is still lagging behind in their implementation of end-to-end solutions, data management, and operational processes for integral connectivity. With more than 90% of consumable goods being shipped around the globe, there are still some unimpeachable factors that need to be accounted for if connectivity is set to be the milestone for a new system of sustainable performance. Yet, there are key players that are beginning to act upon major changes, taking a step forward through strategic collaborations.

The transformational agreement between Maersk Line – the world’s largest shipping company – and Ericsson – the world’s leading provider of technology and services to telecom operators – serves as a chronological example of process innovations and virtual solutions to the importance of ship-to-shore connectivity. This combination of forces strongly adheres to the values and visions outlined by the Swedish corporation; “To lead transformation through mobility, where we as a leading innovator drive transformation of industries and communities towards a sustainable Network Society…”

Back in 2012, the initial agreement contemplated the ongoing installation of mobile and satellite communications technology that enabled the Danish giant to access real-time monitoring across its fleet. Whilst the common connectivity has made its progress throughout time, the core objectives have always been based upon the improvement of vessel operations, fuel consumption, and electric conditions. Again, with nearly 300,000 refrigerated containers annually scheduled to move around 343 ports at 121 countries, Maersk Line faces a logistical challenge and a plausible margin of error that was eclipsed by the use of a Remote Container Management (RCM) system.

Launched in 2015, and under sophisticated technicalities, RCM supports the tracking of ships around the vast oceans, relying on three components: A GPS unit to monitor the movement of a ship, a SIM card that withstands high temperatures and exposure, and a GSM antenna to strengthen data signals. By implementation, Maersk Line has been able to deliver vital statistics of performance that comprises temperature, location, and power supply. At the same time, the shipping company uses the available data to maximise safety, operational/process efficiencies, and cargo care, requiring less manual inspection prior, during, and after-trip missions.

This volume of data is also loaded onto the cloud and sent back to shore-based offices for analysis. But major cloud upgrades have also been employed by the Swedish corporation to enable shipping to benefit from high connectivity, industry applications, and systems integration. The Ericsson’s Maritime ICT cloud, which has already been fortified by the strategic addition of Inmarsat’s Ka-/L- high-speed broadband Fleet Xpress product, offers an end-to-end managed cloud solution that connects vessels at sea to shore-based operations including maintenance service providers, customer support centers, fleet/transportation partners, port operations and authorities.

As part of industry applications, Ericsson’s eye on shipping powers Maersk’s commitment to digital innovations and IoT in the launch of Plug and Play Supply Chain & Logistics. Adhering Plug and Play as a strategic unifier, this digital platform aims to connect corporations to startup companies, enabling an open supply chain and logistics ecosystem. Importantly, this holistic program is set forward to enable a powerful transformation of the freight and logistic industry via a better access of large amounts of data, new technology, and more channels for engaging customers.

Through careful implementation of RCM, ICT Cloud, and industry applications, Ericsson is committed to higher connectivity and bandwidth, and logistics architectures. Nevertheless, Ericsson and Maersk Line are gradually achieving superior integration through voyage optimisation (operations and environmental efficiencies), cargo monitoring (keeping track of cargo through wirelessly connected vessels and real-time communications), and crew morale. This latter factor enhances crew satisfaction and retention rates, efficient coaching and development, and increased ability to cope with health crises that may occur while at sea.

To justify the inclusion of communication technologies and IoT at sea, Orvar Hurtig, Head of industry and Society at Ericsson argues: “Vessels at sea do have systems in place that allow them to monitor critical functions and fuel usage, set and maintain an optimal course and ensure the welfare of their crew, but they are not particularly well integrated with fleet management systems onshore and they do not maximise the potential of real-time data. As the driving force behind the networked society and the world leader in telecommunications, Ericsson is the right partner to help connect these disparate systems and enable them to share information with low latency”

Inevitably, the importance of superior communications and IoT will keep redefining the nature of sea-to-shore connectivity. The transformational agreement between Ericsson and Maersk Line keeps progressing in their pursuit of successful shipping of consumable items, data management, safety/navigation planning, environmental impacts, and real-time communications. Though, it is recommended that ship operators take sea-to-shore connectivity at heart to excel at the abovementioned factors, since Scandinavian firms are sending signals that they are conquering the vast ocean through major investment in digital communications and networks.

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[fusion_builder_container hundred_percent="no" equal_height_columns="no" menu_anchor="" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" class="" id="" background_color="" background_image="" background_position="center center" background_repeat="no-repeat" fade="no" background_parallax="none" parallax_speed="0.3" video_mp4="" video_webm="" video_ogv="" video_url="" video_aspect_ratio="16:9" video_loop="yes" video_mute="yes" overlay_color="" video_preview_image="" border_size="" border_color="" border_style="solid" padding_top="" padding_bottom="" padding_left="" padding_right=""][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type="1_1" layout="1_1" background_position="left top" background_color="" border_size="" border_color="" border_style="solid" border_position="all" spacing="yes" background_image="" background_repeat="no-repeat" padding_top="" padding_right="" padding_bottom="" padding_left="" margin_top="0px" margin_bottom="0px" class="" id="" animation_type="" animation_speed="0.3" animation_direction="left" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" center_content="no" last="no" min_height="" hover_type="none" link=""][fusion_imageframe image_id="4990|full" max_width="" style_type="" blur="" stylecolor="" hover_type="none" bordersize="" bordercolor="" borderradius="" align="center" lightbox="no" gallery_id="" lightbox_image="" lightbox_image_id="" alt="" link="" linktarget="_self" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" class="" id="" animation_type="" animation_direction="left" animation_speed="0.3" animation_offset=""]http://217.199.187.200/valourconsultancy.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/container-158362_1280-1-1024x512-1.png[/fusion_imageframe][fusion_separator style_type="default" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" class="" id="" sep_color="#ffffff" top_margin="20" bottom_margin="20" border_size="" icon="" icon_circle="" icon_circle_color="" width="" alignment="center" /][fusion_text] Despite the moderate adoption of new advancements on communication technologies and industrial IoT, the shipping industry is still lagging behind in their implementation of end-to-end solutions, data management, and operational processes for integral connectivity. With more than 90% of consumable goods being shipped around the globe, there are still some unimpeachable factors that need to be accounted for if connectivity is set to be the milestone for a new system of sustainable performance. Yet, there are key players that are beginning to act upon major changes, taking a step forward through strategic collaborations. The transformational agreement between Maersk Line - the world’s largest shipping company - and Ericsson - the world's leading provider of technology and services to telecom operators - serves as a chronological example of process innovations and virtual solutions to the importance of ship-to-shore connectivity. This combination of forces strongly adheres to the values and visions outlined by the Swedish corporation; “To lead transformation through mobility, where we as a leading innovator drive transformation of industries and communities towards a sustainable Network Society…” Back in 2012, the initial agreement contemplated the ongoing installation of mobile and satellite communications technology that enabled the Danish giant to access real-time monitoring across its fleet. Whilst the common connectivity has made its progress throughout time, the core objectives have always been based upon the improvement of vessel operations, fuel consumption, and electric conditions. Again, with nearly 300,000 refrigerated containers annually scheduled to move around 343 ports at 121 countries, Maersk Line faces a logistical challenge and a plausible margin of error that was eclipsed by the use of a Remote Container Management (RCM) system. Launched in 2015, and under sophisticated technicalities, RCM supports the tracking of ships around the vast oceans, relying on three components: A GPS unit to monitor the movement of a ship, a SIM card that withstands high temperatures and exposure, and a GSM antenna to strengthen data signals. By implementation, Maersk Line has been able to deliver vital statistics of performance that comprises temperature, location, and power supply. At the same time, the shipping company uses the available data to maximise safety, operational/process efficiencies, and cargo care, requiring less manual inspection prior, during, and after-trip missions. This volume of data is also loaded onto the cloud and sent back to shore-based offices for analysis. But major cloud upgrades have also been employed by the Swedish corporation to enable shipping to benefit from high connectivity, industry applications, and systems integration. The Ericsson’s Maritime ICT cloud, which has already been fortified by the strategic addition of Inmarsat’s Ka-/L- high-speed broadband Fleet Xpress product, offers an end-to-end managed cloud solution that connects vessels at sea to shore-based operations including maintenance service providers, customer support centers, fleet/transportation partners, port operations and authorities. As part of industry applications, Ericsson’s eye on shipping powers Maersk’s commitment to digital innovations and IoT in the launch of Plug and Play Supply Chain & Logistics. Adhering Plug and Play as a strategic unifier, this digital platform aims to connect corporations to startup companies, enabling an open supply chain and logistics ecosystem. Importantly, this holistic program is set forward to enable a powerful transformation of the freight and logistic industry via a better access of large amounts of data, new technology, and more channels for engaging customers. Through careful implementation of RCM, ICT Cloud, and industry applications, Ericsson is committed to higher connectivity and bandwidth, and logistics architectures. Nevertheless, Ericsson and Maersk Line are gradually achieving superior integration through voyage optimisation (operations and environmental efficiencies), cargo monitoring (keeping track of cargo through wirelessly connected vessels and real-time communications), and crew morale. This latter factor enhances crew satisfaction and retention rates, efficient coaching and development, and increased ability to cope with health crises that may occur while at sea. To justify the inclusion of communication technologies and IoT at sea, Orvar Hurtig, Head of industry and Society at Ericsson argues: “Vessels at sea do have systems in place that allow them to monitor critical functions and fuel usage, set and maintain an optimal course and ensure the welfare of their crew, but they are not particularly well integrated with fleet management systems onshore and they do not maximise the potential of real-time data. As the driving force behind the networked society and the world leader in telecommunications, Ericsson is the right partner to help connect these disparate systems and enable them to share information with low latency” Inevitably, the importance of superior communications and IoT will keep redefining the nature of sea-to-shore connectivity. The transformational agreement between Ericsson and Maersk Line keeps progressing in their pursuit of successful shipping of consumable items, data management, safety/navigation planning, environmental impacts, and real-time communications. Though, it is recommended that ship operators take sea-to-shore connectivity at heart to excel at the abovementioned factors, since Scandinavian firms are sending signals that they are conquering the vast ocean through major investment in digital communications and networks. [/fusion_text][/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]

Cruise Line Connectivity and Partnering Opportunities

Over the years, the cruise line industry has experienced a period of continuous evolution in regards to integral communications and information technologies. Many stakeholders are leading this charge, since broadband connectivity is becoming a crucial component whereby many passengers decide which cruise line offers the greatest connection of all. The idea of people going on a family/solo cruise to “escape” from ther routine and other obligations is fast becoming outdated.

Nowadays, passengers, along with crew, are demanding superior levels of connectivity and bandwidth at port, near port, and on board. Major cruise companies are aware of this consumer pattern and have diverted efforts towards a systematic level of collaboration and innovation in the industry. In synergy, satellite communication providers and cruise line operators are working together to capitalise on opportunities based on infrastructure, expertise, passenger experience, and efficiencies offered by partnering.

With more than 25 million global passengers projected to cruise this year, carrying aboard multiple sensor-enabled devices with them, cruise line operators are determined to enable the advent of the Internet of Things (IoT) at sea to cure the urgency of costly manned processes and fragmented data management. Yet, its applicability requires a single unification of limitless data systems and a sharing architecture that facilitates end-to-end communications and industry optimisation.

In other words, the confluence of business and technical fashions in the pursuit of interoperability and standardisation of systems builds on incremental connectivity ashore, which is a detour to reach inexpensive and blazing-fast Internet connection for exigent passengers at sea. As an exemplification, it is imperative to observe how three top-tiered cruise line companies – Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings, Carnival Corporation, and Royal Caribbean Cruises – have announced strategic agreements with key satcom solution providers to respond to the demands of IoT at sea and meet the performance expectations of guests/crew on board.

To meet the growing demand for ship connectivity, EMC (now part of Global Eagle) has entered into a long-term strategic agreement with Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings for the provision of high throughput satellite (HTS) links, infotainment, and other terrestrial services. Through major investments in new multi-band antennas that are allocated in multiple strategic angles and Wi-Fi infrastructure, Norwegian Cruise Line has achieved competitive advantage using Very Small Aperture Terminals (VSAT) technology to have rich access to C-, and Ku-band frequencies at sea.

Auxiliary investments in terrestrial broadband networks and web browsing accelerating tools (in this case, EMC’s patented SpeedNet technology) were also implemented in the provision of superior passenger experience and online traffic management. Norwegian Cruise Line has strongly upgraded its Wi-Fi infrastructure to allow not only absolute, ship-to-shore connectivity, but also to develop smart switching technologies that enables passengers/crew to keep browsing using terrestrial links at port, while holding on to satellite links for operational and other core management priorities.

Similar efforts were also led by Carnival Corporation to further enhance guest-onboard experiences through major communication upgrades and innovation. The American-British cruise company signed a five-year contract agreement with Harris CapRock in 2013 to supply fully managed communication services to more than 100 ships across its ten global cruise line brands, using a multi-band VSAT system to enable vessels to power high bandwidth and connectivity under a flat-rate fee for social media usage.

Using the latest generation of iDirect communication technology, via hybrid C- and Ku band solutions, Harris CapRock masters the art of VSAT systems and infrastructure based on global coverage, specialised equipment, secured installation, ongoing maintenance, and, more importantly, 24/7 customer support centers to guarantee proactive monitoring and technical support. By expertise, Harris CapRock is committed to delivering highly improved bandwidth and performance with modern stabilised antennas systems in order to provide new services and infotainment solutions onboard.

Royal Caribbean Cruises has also established a strategic agreement with Harris CapRock to equip new Spacetrack stabilised antennas across its entire fleet, using a combination of Ku- and C-band connectivity. The main objective of the agreement is to provide reliable Internet access in order to attract younger passengers, help retain crew, and streamline operations while at sea. The Melbourne-based communications and IT provider has supplemented performance with the provision of advanced VSAT systems to increase bandwidth, reassigning satellite capacity on demand through a more secure and cost-effective angle.

The collaboration likewise integrates O3b’s medium Earth orbit (MEO) satellite systems for two Royal Caribbean ships, Oasis of the Seas and Allure of the Seas, to benefit from unmatched capacity, consistency, and coverage. Technically, MEO satellites, which orbit the earth at an altitude of approximately 8,000 kilometers, enable even higher bandwidth services as well as optimised Internet and broadband connectivity without experiencing the traditional satellite delays (lag). This new platform improves overall communications performance and guest/crew online experience through breaking-record Internet speed and reliable Wi-Fi capacity.

For the most part, the aforementioned cases explain how cruise ship operators contrastingly partner with major satcom providers to cope with their most perilous challenge – the fulfillment of passenger expectations. However, the key takeaway is that new global technologies that comprises cloud, IOT, mobile platforms, satellite, and big data management are helping turn connectivity challenges into sustainable end-to-end solutions for the maritime sector.

More importantly, cruise operators are required to keep prioritising technology strategies that encourage innovations to pursue an integrated, fully-managed satellite, wireless, and terrestrial connectivity platform to remain ahead of the curve. The ideal communication solution should also embrace hybrid systems, smart switching functions to increase performance at any given point during the voyage, and supporting applications to enhance passenger experience onboard.

Valour Consultancy will soon commence work on the second edition of its acclaimed report “The Future of Maritime Connectivity”. If you would like to learn more about how you can influence the scope of this research so that it more closely matches your needs, please don’t hesitate to get in touch with us.

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[fusion_builder_container hundred_percent="no" equal_height_columns="no" menu_anchor="" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" class="" id="" background_color="" background_image="" background_position="center center" background_repeat="no-repeat" fade="no" background_parallax="none" parallax_speed="0.3" video_mp4="" video_webm="" video_ogv="" video_url="" video_aspect_ratio="16:9" video_loop="yes" video_mute="yes" overlay_color="" video_preview_image="" border_size="" border_color="" border_style="solid" padding_top="" padding_bottom="" padding_left="" padding_right=""][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type="1_1" layout="1_1" background_position="left top" background_color="" border_size="" border_color="" border_style="solid" border_position="all" spacing="yes" background_image="" background_repeat="no-repeat" padding_top="" padding_right="" padding_bottom="" padding_left="" margin_top="0px" margin_bottom="0px" class="" id="" animation_type="" animation_speed="0.3" animation_direction="left" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" center_content="no" last="no" min_height="" hover_type="none" link=""][fusion_imageframe image_id="5000|full" max_width="" style_type="" blur="" stylecolor="" hover_type="none" bordersize="" bordercolor="" borderradius="" align="center" lightbox="no" gallery_id="" lightbox_image="" lightbox_image_id="" alt="" link="" linktarget="_self" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" class="" id="" animation_type="" animation_direction="left" animation_speed="0.3" animation_offset=""]http://217.199.187.200/valourconsultancy.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/ferry-boat-123059_1920-1024x685-1.jpg[/fusion_imageframe][fusion_separator style_type="default" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" class="" id="" sep_color="#ffffff" top_margin="20" bottom_margin="20" border_size="" icon="" icon_circle="" icon_circle_color="" width="" alignment="center" /][fusion_text]Over the years, the cruise line industry has experienced a period of continuous evolution in regards to integral communications and information technologies. Many stakeholders are leading this charge, since broadband connectivity is becoming a crucial component whereby many passengers decide which cruise line offers the greatest connection of all. The idea of people going on a family/solo cruise to “escape” from ther routine and other obligations is fast becoming outdated. Nowadays, passengers, along with crew, are demanding superior levels of connectivity and bandwidth at port, near port, and on board. Major cruise companies are aware of this consumer pattern and have diverted efforts towards a systematic level of collaboration and innovation in the industry. In synergy, satellite communication providers and cruise line operators are working together to capitalise on opportunities based on infrastructure, expertise, passenger experience, and efficiencies offered by partnering. With more than 25 million global passengers projected to cruise this year, carrying aboard multiple sensor-enabled devices with them, cruise line operators are determined to enable the advent of the Internet of Things (IoT) at sea to cure the urgency of costly manned processes and fragmented data management. Yet, its applicability requires a single unification of limitless data systems and a sharing architecture that facilitates end-to-end communications and industry optimisation. In other words, the confluence of business and technical fashions in the pursuit of interoperability and standardisation of systems builds on incremental connectivity ashore, which is a detour to reach inexpensive and blazing-fast Internet connection for exigent passengers at sea. As an exemplification, it is imperative to observe how three top-tiered cruise line companies – Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings, Carnival Corporation, and Royal Caribbean Cruises – have announced strategic agreements with key satcom solution providers to respond to the demands of IoT at sea and meet the performance expectations of guests/crew on board. To meet the growing demand for ship connectivity, EMC (now part of Global Eagle) has entered into a long-term strategic agreement with Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings for the provision of high throughput satellite (HTS) links, infotainment, and other terrestrial services. Through major investments in new multi-band antennas that are allocated in multiple strategic angles and Wi-Fi infrastructure, Norwegian Cruise Line has achieved competitive advantage using Very Small Aperture Terminals (VSAT) technology to have rich access to C-, and Ku-band frequencies at sea. Auxiliary investments in terrestrial broadband networks and web browsing accelerating tools (in this case, EMC’s patented SpeedNet technology) were also implemented in the provision of superior passenger experience and online traffic management. Norwegian Cruise Line has strongly upgraded its Wi-Fi infrastructure to allow not only absolute, ship-to-shore connectivity, but also to develop smart switching technologies that enables passengers/crew to keep browsing using terrestrial links at port, while holding on to satellite links for operational and other core management priorities. Similar efforts were also led by Carnival Corporation to further enhance guest-onboard experiences through major communication upgrades and innovation. The American-British cruise company signed a five-year contract agreement with Harris CapRock in 2013 to supply fully managed communication services to more than 100 ships across its ten global cruise line brands, using a multi-band VSAT system to enable vessels to power high bandwidth and connectivity under a flat-rate fee for social media usage. Using the latest generation of iDirect communication technology, via hybrid C- and Ku band solutions, Harris CapRock masters the art of VSAT systems and infrastructure based on global coverage, specialised equipment, secured installation, ongoing maintenance, and, more importantly, 24/7 customer support centers to guarantee proactive monitoring and technical support. By expertise, Harris CapRock is committed to delivering highly improved bandwidth and performance with modern stabilised antennas systems in order to provide new services and infotainment solutions onboard. Royal Caribbean Cruises has also established a strategic agreement with Harris CapRock to equip new Spacetrack stabilised antennas across its entire fleet, using a combination of Ku- and C-band connectivity. The main objective of the agreement is to provide reliable Internet access in order to attract younger passengers, help retain crew, and streamline operations while at sea. The Melbourne-based communications and IT provider has supplemented performance with the provision of advanced VSAT systems to increase bandwidth, reassigning satellite capacity on demand through a more secure and cost-effective angle. The collaboration likewise integrates O3b’s medium Earth orbit (MEO) satellite systems for two Royal Caribbean ships, Oasis of the Seas and Allure of the Seas, to benefit from unmatched capacity, consistency, and coverage. Technically, MEO satellites, which orbit the earth at an altitude of approximately 8,000 kilometers, enable even higher bandwidth services as well as optimised Internet and broadband connectivity without experiencing the traditional satellite delays (lag). This new platform improves overall communications performance and guest/crew online experience through breaking-record Internet speed and reliable Wi-Fi capacity. For the most part, the aforementioned cases explain how cruise ship operators contrastingly partner with major satcom providers to cope with their most perilous challenge - the fulfillment of passenger expectations. However, the key takeaway is that new global technologies that comprises cloud, IOT, mobile platforms, satellite, and big data management are helping turn connectivity challenges into sustainable end-to-end solutions for the maritime sector. More importantly, cruise operators are required to keep prioritising technology strategies that encourage innovations to pursue an integrated, fully-managed satellite, wireless, and terrestrial connectivity platform to remain ahead of the curve. The ideal communication solution should also embrace hybrid systems, smart switching functions to increase performance at any given point during the voyage, and supporting applications to enhance passenger experience onboard. Valour Consultancy will soon commence work on the second edition of its acclaimed report “The Future of Maritime Connectivity”. If you would like to learn more about how you can influence the scope of this research so that it more closely matches your needs, please don’t hesitate to get in touch with us.[/fusion_text][/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]

The Internet of Aircraft Things: Benefits of eTechlog and eCabin Logbook

eTechlog

The aircraft technical log is the last known status of the aircraft in terms of its current flying hours, current maintenance state (including the carrying of any acceptable deferred defects that may affect the aircraft in operation), the fuel and fluids status for the aircraft at the point of departure, and includes signatures of engineers and pilots that have signed for certain events having been completed on the aircraft turnaround to release the aircraft back into service. The electronic techlog (eTechlog) is an electronic replacement for the paper-based logbook and can be operated on a large range of portable devices.

Though a quickly growing market, eTechlog has still not yet been widely adopted by the world’s airlines. There are several reasons for this. First, the business case is not always immediately obvious and the cost savings are perhaps not as overt as with EFB. Second, eTechlog has an impact on many different airline departments and it can be difficult for these siloes to come together in consensus. Third, the technical logbook is as important as the flight data recorder (FDR) and is therefore highly regulated. Nevertheless, the advent of the iPad – though not a panacea to all electronic processes – has helped spur adoption, while understanding of the benefits surrounding eTechlog is growing and competition is hotting up.

The benefits of eTechlog are numerous and include:

  • Improved data quality. Paper-based technical logbooks consist of handwritten notes. Moving to eTechlog ensures that there is no debate around what has been written and mistakes associated with transcribing these notes are eliminated. With eTechlog, information can be captured in legible free form or better still, using pre-defined text entries to remove any element of doubt.
  • Central booking staff are no longer required to manually enter logbook entries into back-end systems thus reducing administration costs.
  • Costs associated with the purchasing, storing, handling and transportation of paper are eradicated.
  • Data is transferred automatically to airline maintenance operations control centres via on-ground networks or IFC. This provides engineering and flight operations with real-time analysis and control. Traditionally, paper logbook pages are faxed/scanned back and this makes it difficult to guarantee the timely and accurate delivery of technical data.
  • No more compliance issues around lost logbooks, or logbooks on the wrong aircraft.
  • More efficient maintenance actions. By having access to consistent and accurate data, there is less likelihood of parts being wrongly replaced. Longer term analysis of data can also reveal trends that indicate when and why a defect may occur allowing shop visits to be scheduled accordingly.
  • For mobile eTechlog solutions (i.e. those that are not permanently mounted or installed), supplemental type certificates (STCs) are not required, which represents another large cost saving.
  • With in-flight offload of information, initial troubleshooting can begin immediately and labour/parts sent to the arrival airport to carry out any remedial action, potentially preventing or minimising delays for a faster turnaround.

Currently, there is a debate around whether there is a need to offload eTechlog data during flight. One school of thought suggests that any serious problems arising mid-flight are best tackled by the pilot who should not otherwise be concerned with entering the details of the problem in eTechlog. On the flip side, there is a strong argument for data to be sent in real-time. As mentioned in the last bullet point above, the possibility of having aircraft turned around quicker is compelling. The increase in aircraft equipped with IFC is driving the desire to send eTechlog data in flight. Though ACARS can be used, there is some trepidation around the cost and somewhat limited nature of this transmission medium. Another benefit of using IFC is that logbook data can be stored on the on-board server meaning a master copy is essentially kept on the aircraft at all times.

Despite these benefits, some airlines remain convinced that the paper-based logbook is quicker and more efficient. The challenge for industry participants is, therefore, to try and convince airlines that there are tangible cost savings to be had by implementing eTechlog. Companies interviewed for out recently published report “How the Connected Aircraft Fits into the Internet of Things” indicated that a typical ROI is in the region of 18 months, sometimes less. Conduce, one of the leading vendors in this space, claims relatively accurate data from an undisclosed airline customer shows cost savings over a five-year period are around €3-5 million. Of course, actual savings and business benefits of adopting eTechlog vary greatly and are dependent upon several factors specific to the airline. As an example, an isolated maintenance delay for a large airline consisting of 500-600 aircraft would have much less of an impact than it would on a much smaller airline with say, 20 aircraft in the fleet. Ultramain, another key eTechlog solution provider, has developed a free app called eJustify, which aims to walk airlines through how, exactly, eTechlog can be beneficial.

It should be noted that there are two distinct methods to delivering eTechlog. The first involves software loaded onto a dedicated device that is used only for this purpose. Conduce is a proponent of this approach and installs its eTechLog8 application on appropriately approved Windows tablets, which are completely locked down and managed by the company. They are supplied with a Certificate of Conformity and treated in the same as any other aircraft component and so become aircraft-centric and tail-specific. For others, eTechlog is one of many EFB applications. As such, they are pilot-centric in their use and are issued directly to the pilot who takes it on and off the aircraft.

As eTechlog adoption gathers momentum, we are likely to see a shift towards more and more solutions transmitting data during flight over IFC. Additionally, eTechlog will morph into a much more advanced solution that combines data from a myriad of onboard sensors and components. Such a scenario might see a level of communication between previously disparate aircraft systems that allow for certain logbook entries to be completed automatically, without any input from the pilot except for his or her approval. This would further reduce the pilot’s workload, ensure even more accurate data entry as well as reduce so-called no-fault found (NFF) errors.

This last point is particularly important as NFF part replacements cost airlines millions of dollars every year. For the uninitiated, NFF refers to a situation where a part is replaced to repair an apparently failed piece of equipment. When the part is returned to the factory for quality analysis or for repair and re-certification, diagnostic tests do not detect any problem. Although a rare occurrence, engineers sometimes replace a part but are unable to update the information in the technical logbook. As such, the team at the next stop may still see an action indicated in the system and replace the part again, unnecessarily.

Apart from Conduce and Ultramain, other notable vendors in this space are NVABLE and CrossConsense.

eCabin Logbook

Paper log books aren’t just the preserve of the cockpit. Crew members use cabin logbooks to record any defects they encounter in the cabin. This can include things like faulty in-flight entertainment (IFE) systems, lightbulbs that need replacing and even broken or dirty seats. These paper write-ups are handed to the pilot who then enters into the technical logbook any defects that are airworthiness related and reports them to maintenance via ACARS.

As is the case with the paper technical log, issues with illegible handwriting and manual data entry are not uncommon, while the reporting phase often happens during the aircraft’s descent when pilots are busiest. eCabin logbook is faster, more accurate, more reliable and more efficient. Additionally, devices hosting eCabin logbook software can be linked to eTechlog hardware via connectivity such as Wi-Fi Direct so that defects are automatically recorded in the latter. However, several airlines have opted for standalone eCabin logbook before embracing eTechlog, which is a broader application, and this is reflective of a phased approach to connected aircraft applications more generally.

The capabilities of the eCabin logbook will continue to expand in future. Sensors in the cabin will doubtless be able to self-report defects and record them automatically. Cabin crews would simply review entries for approval rather that reporting them manually. As with eTechlog, analysis of cabin defects over time may well reveal patterns that result in improved ability to predict and respond.

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eTechlog

The aircraft technical log is the last known status of the aircraft in terms of its current flying hours, current maintenance state (including the carrying of any acceptable deferred defects that may affect the aircraft in operation), the fuel and fluids status for the aircraft at the point of departure, and includes signatures of engineers and pilots that have signed for certain events having been completed on the aircraft turnaround to release the aircraft back into service. The electronic techlog (eTechlog) is an electronic replacement for the paper-based logbook and can be operated on a large range of portable devices. Though a quickly growing market, eTechlog has still not yet been widely adopted by the world’s airlines. There are several reasons for this. First, the business case is not always immediately obvious and the cost savings are perhaps not as overt as with EFB. Second, eTechlog has an impact on many different airline departments and it can be difficult for these siloes to come together in consensus. Third, the technical logbook is as important as the flight data recorder (FDR) and is therefore highly regulated. Nevertheless, the advent of the iPad – though not a panacea to all electronic processes – has helped spur adoption, while understanding of the benefits surrounding eTechlog is growing and competition is hotting up. The benefits of eTechlog are numerous and include:
  • Improved data quality. Paper-based technical logbooks consist of handwritten notes. Moving to eTechlog ensures that there is no debate around what has been written and mistakes associated with transcribing these notes are eliminated. With eTechlog, information can be captured in legible free form or better still, using pre-defined text entries to remove any element of doubt.
  • Central booking staff are no longer required to manually enter logbook entries into back-end systems thus reducing administration costs.
  • Costs associated with the purchasing, storing, handling and transportation of paper are eradicated.
  • Data is transferred automatically to airline maintenance operations control centres via on-ground networks or IFC. This provides engineering and flight operations with real-time analysis and control. Traditionally, paper logbook pages are faxed/scanned back and this makes it difficult to guarantee the timely and accurate delivery of technical data.
  • No more compliance issues around lost logbooks, or logbooks on the wrong aircraft.
  • More efficient maintenance actions. By having access to consistent and accurate data, there is less likelihood of parts being wrongly replaced. Longer term analysis of data can also reveal trends that indicate when and why a defect may occur allowing shop visits to be scheduled accordingly.
  • For mobile eTechlog solutions (i.e. those that are not permanently mounted or installed), supplemental type certificates (STCs) are not required, which represents another large cost saving.
  • With in-flight offload of information, initial troubleshooting can begin immediately and labour/parts sent to the arrival airport to carry out any remedial action, potentially preventing or minimising delays for a faster turnaround.
Currently, there is a debate around whether there is a need to offload eTechlog data during flight. One school of thought suggests that any serious problems arising mid-flight are best tackled by the pilot who should not otherwise be concerned with entering the details of the problem in eTechlog. On the flip side, there is a strong argument for data to be sent in real-time. As mentioned in the last bullet point above, the possibility of having aircraft turned around quicker is compelling. The increase in aircraft equipped with IFC is driving the desire to send eTechlog data in flight. Though ACARS can be used, there is some trepidation around the cost and somewhat limited nature of this transmission medium. Another benefit of using IFC is that logbook data can be stored on the on-board server meaning a master copy is essentially kept on the aircraft at all times. Despite these benefits, some airlines remain convinced that the paper-based logbook is quicker and more efficient. The challenge for industry participants is, therefore, to try and convince airlines that there are tangible cost savings to be had by implementing eTechlog. Companies interviewed for out recently published report “How the Connected Aircraft Fits into the Internet of Things” indicated that a typical ROI is in the region of 18 months, sometimes less. Conduce, one of the leading vendors in this space, claims relatively accurate data from an undisclosed airline customer shows cost savings over a five-year period are around €3-5 million. Of course, actual savings and business benefits of adopting eTechlog vary greatly and are dependent upon several factors specific to the airline. As an example, an isolated maintenance delay for a large airline consisting of 500-600 aircraft would have much less of an impact than it would on a much smaller airline with say, 20 aircraft in the fleet. Ultramain, another key eTechlog solution provider, has developed a free app called eJustify, which aims to walk airlines through how, exactly, eTechlog can be beneficial. It should be noted that there are two distinct methods to delivering eTechlog. The first involves software loaded onto a dedicated device that is used only for this purpose. Conduce is a proponent of this approach and installs its eTechLog8 application on appropriately approved Windows tablets, which are completely locked down and managed by the company. They are supplied with a Certificate of Conformity and treated in the same as any other aircraft component and so become aircraft-centric and tail-specific. For others, eTechlog is one of many EFB applications. As such, they are pilot-centric in their use and are issued directly to the pilot who takes it on and off the aircraft. As eTechlog adoption gathers momentum, we are likely to see a shift towards more and more solutions transmitting data during flight over IFC. Additionally, eTechlog will morph into a much more advanced solution that combines data from a myriad of onboard sensors and components. Such a scenario might see a level of communication between previously disparate aircraft systems that allow for certain logbook entries to be completed automatically, without any input from the pilot except for his or her approval. This would further reduce the pilot’s workload, ensure even more accurate data entry as well as reduce so-called no-fault found (NFF) errors. This last point is particularly important as NFF part replacements cost airlines millions of dollars every year. For the uninitiated, NFF refers to a situation where a part is replaced to repair an apparently failed piece of equipment. When the part is returned to the factory for quality analysis or for repair and re-certification, diagnostic tests do not detect any problem. Although a rare occurrence, engineers sometimes replace a part but are unable to update the information in the technical logbook. As such, the team at the next stop may still see an action indicated in the system and replace the part again, unnecessarily. Apart from Conduce and Ultramain, other notable vendors in this space are NVABLE and CrossConsense.

eCabin Logbook

Paper log books aren’t just the preserve of the cockpit. Crew members use cabin logbooks to record any defects they encounter in the cabin. This can include things like faulty in-flight entertainment (IFE) systems, lightbulbs that need replacing and even broken or dirty seats. These paper write-ups are handed to the pilot who then enters into the technical logbook any defects that are airworthiness related and reports them to maintenance via ACARS. As is the case with the paper technical log, issues with illegible handwriting and manual data entry are not uncommon, while the reporting phase often happens during the aircraft’s descent when pilots are busiest. eCabin logbook is faster, more accurate, more reliable and more efficient. Additionally, devices hosting eCabin logbook software can be linked to eTechlog hardware via connectivity such as Wi-Fi Direct so that defects are automatically recorded in the latter. However, several airlines have opted for standalone eCabin logbook before embracing eTechlog, which is a broader application, and this is reflective of a phased approach to connected aircraft applications more generally. The capabilities of the eCabin logbook will continue to expand in future. Sensors in the cabin will doubtless be able to self-report defects and record them automatically. Cabin crews would simply review entries for approval rather that reporting them manually. As with eTechlog, analysis of cabin defects over time may well reveal patterns that result in improved ability to predict and respond. [/fusion_text][/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]