FILTER POSTS SHOW ALL AVIATION MARITIME
FILTER POSTS SHOW ALL AVIATION MARITIME

Hyundai Heavy Industries pioneers Smart Ship Solutions

In early July 2017, South Korean shipbuilder Hyundai Heavy Industries (HHI) announced the debut of their proprietary Information and Communications Technology (ICT) system to accelerate internal communications and navigation efficiencies. Its goal is to capitalise on economic opportunities, sophisticated access to modern navigation technologies, and vessel management and engineering. Far from a commitment to efficiency and safety, connecting vessels ashore appears to be a new milestone in the firm’s pursuit of an Integrated Smart Ship Solution (ISSS) and effective management of stakeholders.

To extend continuity and customer care across the value chain, smart ship solutions go deeper into the management of big data improvements to guarantee uninterrupted, coordinated navigation with increasing availability of fully-functional features onboard, and tested engineering-oriented tools and backups. Through performance, the corporation outlined how ISSS provides a wide range of ship information to operators, including optimal navigation routes and navigation speed along with a slope status of the front and back hull to minimise the resistance a ship encounters on voyage.

Proactive monitoring, along with action plans are also key improvements when it comes to stakeholder demands and engineering methods. It is a clear response to the different voices found within the industry, from port operators who insist on programmed cooperation and productivity at port, to meticulous management of transparency and vessel history from insurers. From an engineering perspective, ISSS allows for safer and more efficient management of vessels by working on energy data and keeping track of powered engines and other equipment for optimised navigation.

According to HHI, the solution, after completing regular field testing and applied in a 6,500 pure car/truck carriers (PCTC) and a 250,000 deadweight tonnage of very large ore carriers (DWT VLOC), is expected to reduce annual operating costs by 6 percent, which, ultimately, would increase profit margins and expertise. At the same time, ISSS addresses other challenges already found in both the maritime industry and business infrastructure, namely; over-capacity, inefficient costs of navigation, sustainable and safety needs, as well as IoT/digital/satellite technologies that tackle dated business models, and excruciating, traditional ways of ship-to-shore communications.

It is predicted that demand for smart ships will have a positive impact on the maritime industry as operational and safety needs are pushing the agenda all the way to the top for highly competitive shipbuilders. Coupled with research and predictions, the International Maritime Organization (IMO) will also introduce e-Navigation as a component that provides excellent organisation of data for commercial ships by 2019, which assists the progress of meaningful stakeholder relationships and pushes the demand for smart ships even further.

Beyond the potentiality that smart ships have on performance, there is continuous work and evolution that has led HHI to a competitive level of expertise. In 2011, the shipbuilder launched a cutting-edge version of its smart ship solutions – “a first of its kind” system – and has since implemented the technology on approximately 300 delivered ships as of 2017. Combining unparalleled expertise and internal capabilities, HHI acquired solid experience by partnering with Accenture – a global management consulting, technology services, and outsourcing company – to create an innovative system designed to reach major competitiveness with real-time data.

This collaboration has not only allowed HHI to master the arts of the IoT and built-in technologies, but also to optimise navigation and operational savings while moving successfully from the manufacturing field to services. “ HHI’s technology seeks to align with delivering the key benefits we believe the maritime industry will most benefit from through the adoption of connected, digital and autonomous technologies as the next generation of shipping embraces digitalisation,” said Luis Benito, director of Marine and Offshore Innovation, Strategy, and Research for Lloyd’s Register.

Another important milestone took place earlier in May this year, when HHI and Bhari – the National Shipping Company of Saudi Arabia – signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to strengthen long-lasting relationships and commit to current and future projects. Both parties have agreed that working together is crucial to the design of data-driven initiatives that give the green light to a better decision-making process, generate higher revenues, and achieve customer satisfaction in the transportation industry.

As time goes by HHI has taken a lead in the development of smart shipping solutions for safer navigation and efficient ship routing. HHI has also designed a vessel data model as a foundation platform that will secure the transfer of whole data from sea to shore, delivering multiple, reliable services to ship owners. Perhaps some of these technologies will be supplemented and operated by Middle East owners to enhance its collaborations, or it may be the case that HHI would contemplate a successful move from initial on-ship services to a promising, stakeholder-oriented scenario.

Recently, although HHI has suffered a substantial loss of approximately 12 percent of ship sales in 2015, the company is still ranked first with over USD 24.4 billion worth of vessels on order as of 2016. However, important technology developments along with green and other stakeholder demands are once again re-defining the industry. “According to Clarkson Research, about 6,500 ships are to be ordered globally for the next five years. Considering the global shipbuilding market share attributed to HHI, ISSS is to be installed on approximately 700 ships for the comparable time period,” continued Benito.

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[fusion_builder_container hundred_percent="no" equal_height_columns="no" menu_anchor="" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" class="" id="" background_color="" background_image="" background_position="center center" background_repeat="no-repeat" fade="no" background_parallax="none" parallax_speed="0.3" video_mp4="" video_webm="" video_ogv="" video_url="" video_aspect_ratio="16:9" video_loop="yes" video_mute="yes" overlay_color="" video_preview_image="" border_size="" border_color="" border_style="solid" padding_top="" padding_bottom="" padding_left="" padding_right=""][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type="1_1" layout="1_1" background_position="left top" background_color="" border_size="" border_color="" border_style="solid" border_position="all" spacing="yes" background_image="" background_repeat="no-repeat" padding_top="" padding_right="" padding_bottom="" padding_left="" margin_top="0px" margin_bottom="0px" class="" id="" animation_type="" animation_speed="0.3" animation_direction="left" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" center_content="no" last="no" min_height="" hover_type="none" link=""][fusion_imageframe image_id="4959|full" max_width="" style_type="" blur="" stylecolor="" hover_type="none" bordersize="" bordercolor="" borderradius="" align="center" lightbox="no" gallery_id="" lightbox_image="" lightbox_image_id="" alt="" link="" linktarget="_self" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" class="" id="" animation_type="" animation_direction="left" animation_speed="0.3" animation_offset=""]http://217.199.187.200/valourconsultancy.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Fotosearch_k27019534-1024x683-1.jpg[/fusion_imageframe][fusion_separator style_type="default" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" class="" id="" sep_color="#ffffff" top_margin="20" bottom_margin="20" border_size="" icon="" icon_circle="" icon_circle_color="" width="" alignment="center" /][fusion_text] In early July 2017, South Korean shipbuilder Hyundai Heavy Industries (HHI) announced the debut of their proprietary Information and Communications Technology (ICT) system to accelerate internal communications and navigation efficiencies. Its goal is to capitalise on economic opportunities, sophisticated access to modern navigation technologies, and vessel management and engineering. Far from a commitment to efficiency and safety, connecting vessels ashore appears to be a new milestone in the firm’s pursuit of an Integrated Smart Ship Solution (ISSS) and effective management of stakeholders. To extend continuity and customer care across the value chain, smart ship solutions go deeper into the management of big data improvements to guarantee uninterrupted, coordinated navigation with increasing availability of fully-functional features onboard, and tested engineering-oriented tools and backups. Through performance, the corporation outlined how ISSS provides a wide range of ship information to operators, including optimal navigation routes and navigation speed along with a slope status of the front and back hull to minimise the resistance a ship encounters on voyage. Proactive monitoring, along with action plans are also key improvements when it comes to stakeholder demands and engineering methods. It is a clear response to the different voices found within the industry, from port operators who insist on programmed cooperation and productivity at port, to meticulous management of transparency and vessel history from insurers. From an engineering perspective, ISSS allows for safer and more efficient management of vessels by working on energy data and keeping track of powered engines and other equipment for optimised navigation. According to HHI, the solution, after completing regular field testing and applied in a 6,500 pure car/truck carriers (PCTC) and a 250,000 deadweight tonnage of very large ore carriers (DWT VLOC), is expected to reduce annual operating costs by 6 percent, which, ultimately, would increase profit margins and expertise. At the same time, ISSS addresses other challenges already found in both the maritime industry and business infrastructure, namely; over-capacity, inefficient costs of navigation, sustainable and safety needs, as well as IoT/digital/satellite technologies that tackle dated business models, and excruciating, traditional ways of ship-to-shore communications. It is predicted that demand for smart ships will have a positive impact on the maritime industry as operational and safety needs are pushing the agenda all the way to the top for highly competitive shipbuilders. Coupled with research and predictions, the International Maritime Organization (IMO) will also introduce e-Navigation as a component that provides excellent organisation of data for commercial ships by 2019, which assists the progress of meaningful stakeholder relationships and pushes the demand for smart ships even further. Beyond the potentiality that smart ships have on performance, there is continuous work and evolution that has led HHI to a competitive level of expertise. In 2011, the shipbuilder launched a cutting-edge version of its smart ship solutions – “a first of its kind” system – and has since implemented the technology on approximately 300 delivered ships as of 2017. Combining unparalleled expertise and internal capabilities, HHI acquired solid experience by partnering with Accenture – a global management consulting, technology services, and outsourcing company – to create an innovative system designed to reach major competitiveness with real-time data. This collaboration has not only allowed HHI to master the arts of the IoT and built-in technologies, but also to optimise navigation and operational savings while moving successfully from the manufacturing field to services. “ HHI’s technology seeks to align with delivering the key benefits we believe the maritime industry will most benefit from through the adoption of connected, digital and autonomous technologies as the next generation of shipping embraces digitalisation,” said Luis Benito, director of Marine and Offshore Innovation, Strategy, and Research for Lloyd’s Register. Another important milestone took place earlier in May this year, when HHI and Bhari – the National Shipping Company of Saudi Arabia – signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to strengthen long-lasting relationships and commit to current and future projects. Both parties have agreed that working together is crucial to the design of data-driven initiatives that give the green light to a better decision-making process, generate higher revenues, and achieve customer satisfaction in the transportation industry. As time goes by HHI has taken a lead in the development of smart shipping solutions for safer navigation and efficient ship routing. HHI has also designed a vessel data model as a foundation platform that will secure the transfer of whole data from sea to shore, delivering multiple, reliable services to ship owners. Perhaps some of these technologies will be supplemented and operated by Middle East owners to enhance its collaborations, or it may be the case that HHI would contemplate a successful move from initial on-ship services to a promising, stakeholder-oriented scenario. Recently, although HHI has suffered a substantial loss of approximately 12 percent of ship sales in 2015, the company is still ranked first with over USD 24.4 billion worth of vessels on order as of 2016. However, important technology developments along with green and other stakeholder demands are once again re-defining the industry. “According to Clarkson Research, about 6,500 ships are to be ordered globally for the next five years. Considering the global shipbuilding market share attributed to HHI, ISSS is to be installed on approximately 700 ships for the comparable time period,” continued Benito. [/fusion_text][/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]

Smart Airports: New Technologies Set to Take Flight & Transform the Passenger Journey

The following blog was written by John Devlin, founder of P.A.ID Strategies, one of Valour Consultancy’s trusted partners. The original article can be viewed here.

Future Growth is Outstripping Capacity

With forecasts for growth in air travel ranging from 60% to 100% over the next 20 years, airport operators, airlines and governments face a number of significant challenges.  The predominant question is how to cope with the far greater passenger numbers (and airfreight) without doubling the number of airports.  There will certainly continue to be new airports built, new runways added to existing airports, plus renovation of terminals to ensure that service standards are maintained but it is not cost effective or practical for a combination of reasons to think that future demand can be met by simply building more airports.

Efficiency Over Capacity

So how will this be addressed?  Capacity will be increased but not, as said, by doubling the number of airports.  Generally, airports are in the right places to meet demand and creating multiple versions of the same infrastructure and human resources is inefficient and creates a drain on the available knowledge and skills-base.  Whilst most airports are relatively efficient, they have largely been following the formulae and procedures put in place in the 1950s, 60s and 70s.  Yes, operationally as traffic has increased airports have refined their procedures but essentially, they have not evolved to any great degree.  Better asset utilisation and understanding of and interaction with passengers are key objectives for many airports operators.

Traditional Models are being Disrupted

There certainly remains a need for strong regulation and security but as businesses and consumers have embraced innovative technologies, especially around mobile and the personalisation of services, the passenger experience has not yet progressed to any great degree.  Many businesses and industries have been transformed over the past 5-10 years.  Connectivity, the Internet and smartphones have been the catalyst for much of this.  However, advances in infrastructure, especially at end-points and with the IoT, generate better data, enable more personalisation of services and allow more context to be added to the user experience.

Traditional industries no longer have a lock-down on how their service and/or product is provided, bought or consumed.  The Internet has had a major effect on the travel sector, changing how we buy flights, hotels and even airport parking but it all stops at the airport door.  We don’t expect to see disruption on the scale of Uber affect the airlines – at least not in the next 10-15 years – but we do believe that the competitive drivers within the sector will see more movement than we have to date.

Airports and Aviation are Ready for Digital Transformation

We are approaching an inflection point for the sector.  Competition between airlines is not going away and with advances in other areas of (personal) transportation and mass transit this will continue to intensify.  Airport operators are competing more than ever to attract passenger traffic and ensure that they can offer the most attractive financial and service proposition to the airlines.  Balanced against this they have to be careful to ensure that they maintain or improve their customer satisfaction levels.

Costs and pricing can only affect so much of the decision.  The passenger experience is now a differentiating factor and as prices have been driven down there is an increasing focus on generating ancillary revenues – both in-flight and on the ground for both airlines and airport operators.  We have had mobile apps from airlines for a few years but they are very focused on loyalty and do not go much beyond checking-in and boarding passes in terms of tailoring to individuals.  There is little tie in with retail and hospitality, or travelling to and from the airport and parking, car-hire, refreshments, in-flight entertainment and personalised updates.  There most certainly is no ability to connect with the airport and ease the biggest pain points of queueing through security and at the boarding gate.

Future Technologies for Smart Airports – Creating the Digital Passenger Experience

Mobile, apps, online, digital and mobile identity, know your customer (KYC) and authenticating identity, biometrics (facial, fingerprint, iris), sensors, beacons, new forms of payment, mobile wallets, NFC and contactless, RFID, Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, intelligent video analytics, big data, new human interface technologies, chatbots, robots and intelligent assistants.  These are all existing technologies and progressing rapidly, often happening behind the scenes but affecting how we use services and the decisions that we make.

These technologies can be employed within a future smart airport environment, reducing queues, improving the passenger experience, helping operators, airlines and their partners better engage with their customers, understand them and meet their requirements.  In turn, this has the upside of better customer service and improved loyalty as well as greater revenue potential, whilst also creating more efficient airports that are better able to meet future demand and capacity requirements.

Note: Three analyst firms are working together to provide a detailed analysis of Future Technologies for Smart Airports.  Their combined expertise, insight and knowledge will provide the most comprehensive assessments for smart airports.  P.A.ID Strategies provides nearly 20 years of experience around mobile, identity, payments, biometrics, NFC, RFID and security.  SAR Insight has 20 years of knowledge in the semiconductor sector with expertise in Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, sensors, smart devices and the IoT.  Valour Consultancy has over 30 years’ analyst experience and is the leading provider of market intelligence for in-flight connectivity, in-flight entertainment, cabin technology, connected aircraft and the IoT.

They are working to develop a new market report entitled “Future Technologies for Smart Airports – creating the digital passenger experience” examining the potential adoption of modern technologies to make airports smarter, more efficient and deliver better service to customers and partners.  Please contact John Devlin at info@paidstrategies.com for more information.

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The original article can be viewed here. Future Growth is Outstripping Capacity With forecasts for growth in air travel ranging from 60% to 100% over the next 20 years, airport operators, airlines and governments face a number of significant challenges.  The predominant question is how to cope with the far greater passenger numbers (and airfreight) without doubling the number of airports.  There will certainly continue to be new airports built, new runways added to existing airports, plus renovation of terminals to ensure that service standards are maintained but it is not cost effective or practical for a combination of reasons to think that future demand can be met by simply building more airports. Efficiency Over Capacity So how will this be addressed?  Capacity will be increased but not, as said, by doubling the number of airports.  Generally, airports are in the right places to meet demand and creating multiple versions of the same infrastructure and human resources is inefficient and creates a drain on the available knowledge and skills-base.  Whilst most airports are relatively efficient, they have largely been following the formulae and procedures put in place in the 1950s, 60s and 70s.  Yes, operationally as traffic has increased airports have refined their procedures but essentially, they have not evolved to any great degree.  Better asset utilisation and understanding of and interaction with passengers are key objectives for many airports operators. Traditional Models are being Disrupted There certainly remains a need for strong regulation and security but as businesses and consumers have embraced innovative technologies, especially around mobile and the personalisation of services, the passenger experience has not yet progressed to any great degree.  Many businesses and industries have been transformed over the past 5-10 years.  Connectivity, the Internet and smartphones have been the catalyst for much of this.  However, advances in infrastructure, especially at end-points and with the IoT, generate better data, enable more personalisation of services and allow more context to be added to the user experience. Traditional industries no longer have a lock-down on how their service and/or product is provided, bought or consumed.  The Internet has had a major effect on the travel sector, changing how we buy flights, hotels and even airport parking but it all stops at the airport door.  We don’t expect to see disruption on the scale of Uber affect the airlines – at least not in the next 10-15 years – but we do believe that the competitive drivers within the sector will see more movement than we have to date. Airports and Aviation are Ready for Digital Transformation We are approaching an inflection point for the sector.  Competition between airlines is not going away and with advances in other areas of (personal) transportation and mass transit this will continue to intensify.  Airport operators are competing more than ever to attract passenger traffic and ensure that they can offer the most attractive financial and service proposition to the airlines.  Balanced against this they have to be careful to ensure that they maintain or improve their customer satisfaction levels. Costs and pricing can only affect so much of the decision.  The passenger experience is now a differentiating factor and as prices have been driven down there is an increasing focus on generating ancillary revenues – both in-flight and on the ground for both airlines and airport operators.  We have had mobile apps from airlines for a few years but they are very focused on loyalty and do not go much beyond checking-in and boarding passes in terms of tailoring to individuals.  There is little tie in with retail and hospitality, or travelling to and from the airport and parking, car-hire, refreshments, in-flight entertainment and personalised updates.  There most certainly is no ability to connect with the airport and ease the biggest pain points of queueing through security and at the boarding gate. Future Technologies for Smart Airports – Creating the Digital Passenger Experience Mobile, apps, online, digital and mobile identity, know your customer (KYC) and authenticating identity, biometrics (facial, fingerprint, iris), sensors, beacons, new forms of payment, mobile wallets, NFC and contactless, RFID, Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, intelligent video analytics, big data, new human interface technologies, chatbots, robots and intelligent assistants.  These are all existing technologies and progressing rapidly, often happening behind the scenes but affecting how we use services and the decisions that we make. These technologies can be employed within a future smart airport environment, reducing queues, improving the passenger experience, helping operators, airlines and their partners better engage with their customers, understand them and meet their requirements.  In turn, this has the upside of better customer service and improved loyalty as well as greater revenue potential, whilst also creating more efficient airports that are better able to meet future demand and capacity requirements. Note: Three analyst firms are working together to provide a detailed analysis of Future Technologies for Smart Airports.  Their combined expertise, insight and knowledge will provide the most comprehensive assessments for smart airports.  P.A.ID Strategies provides nearly 20 years of experience around mobile, identity, payments, biometrics, NFC, RFID and security.  SAR Insight has 20 years of knowledge in the semiconductor sector with expertise in Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, sensors, smart devices and the IoT.  Valour Consultancy has over 30 years’ analyst experience and is the leading provider of market intelligence for in-flight connectivity, in-flight entertainment, cabin technology, connected aircraft and the IoT. They are working to develop a new market report entitled “Future Technologies for Smart Airports – creating the digital passenger experience” examining the potential adoption of modern technologies to make airports smarter, more efficient and deliver better service to customers and partners.  Please contact John Devlin at info@paidstrategies.com for more information. [/fusion_text][/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]